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Category: Intertextual Networks

Creating the Intertextual Networks Genre Taxonomy

Creating the Intertextual Networks Genre Taxonomy

This is a post in a series authored by our encoding team on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Kenneth Oravetz, WWP Research Fellow, Northeastern University I joined the WWP in the middle of the Intertextual Networks project, an effort to create a comprehensive bibliography of the works cited, quoted, and alluded to by the authors in Women Writers Online, the main WWP collection of pre-Victorian women’s writing. Following my aforementioned interests in genre classification, I decided to…

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Like a Woman: Gender Confusion in The Merry Wives of Windsor and Who’s the Dupe?

Like a Woman: Gender Confusion in The Merry Wives of Windsor and Who’s the Dupe?

This is a post in a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Tabitha Kenlon, Assistant Professor at the American University in Dubai My previous post explored eighteenth-century British playwright Hannah Cowley’s references to and borrowings from William Shakespeare in her A Bold Stroke for a Husband. That play contains a direct reference to Taming of the Shrew and features a cross-dressed heroine and a love quadrangle that seems to have been inspired by…

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Literary Exceptionalism, Literary Community: Mary Wroth in Context

Literary Exceptionalism, Literary Community: Mary Wroth in Context

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Amanda Henrichs, Amherst College In my previous post for the Intertextual Networks project, I outlined some of the background of the Sidney family and of my planned contribution to the project; briefly, scholarship on the women of the Sidney family accepts as fact a strong literary relationship between Mary Wroth and her aunt Mary Sidney Herbert. Wroth is mostly clearly influenced…

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To the Right Honourable, Virtuous, Heroical Reader

To the Right Honourable, Virtuous, Heroical Reader

This post was authored by Anna Kroon, University of New Haven class of 2019, who held an internship at the WWP during the summer of 2017.  I came to the Women Writers Project really excited to work on such a large project with a wide variety of texts in their files. My experience was limited to Victorian shipboard newspapers, so anything not related to the ocean or intellectual boat humor was thrilling to me. Since I had experience with XML…

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Intertextual Networks: Theorizing and Encoding Textual Connections in Early Women’s Writing

Intertextual Networks: Theorizing and Encoding Textual Connections in Early Women’s Writing

Below are lecture notes from a paper by Sarah Connell and Julia Flanders, part of a panel on intertextuality in early women’s texts at DH2017.  I want to begin by thanking our co-panelists for their really thoughtful and exciting presentations, as well as my co-author Julia Flanders, the conference organizers, and, of course, all of you for joining us today. I also have to thank the NEH for their support of this project as well as the rest of the…

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Intertextuality in Mary Astell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies (1694) and in Reflections upon Marriage (1706)

Intertextuality in Mary Astell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies (1694) and in Reflections upon Marriage (1706)

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Ioanna Kyvernitou, National University of Ireland, Galway  For Intertextual Networks, I am evaluating the markup in two works of Mary Astell (1666–1731) as found in Women Writers Online–A Serious Proposal to the Ladies, for the Advancement of Their True and Greatest Interest (1694) and the third edition of Reflections upon Marriage (1706)–in order to consider practices for encoding intertextuality. Astell, a philosopher and theologian who…

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The Queen’s Two Corpora: Finding Elizabeth using the WWO Database

The Queen’s Two Corpora: Finding Elizabeth using the WWO Database

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Kristen Abbott Bennett, Framingham State University At Tilbury, Elizabeth I gave a rousing speech to motivate her subjects, exclaiming: “I know I have the bodie, but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and Stomach of a King, and of a King of England” (Cabala). Elizabeth’s recognition of her female princely bodies as simultaneously separate and the same…

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Rhetorical Intertextualities of M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse

Rhetorical Intertextualities of M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Dr. Elizabeth Ann Mackay, University of Dayton My project for the Women Writers Project explores an oft-cited, but rarely studied, mother’s advice book: M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse (1631). Compared to other seventeenth-century mother’s advice books, blessings, and legacies, such as Dorothy Leigh’s The Mothers Blessing, Elizabeth Clinton’s The Countesse of Lincolnes Nurserie, and Elizabeth Joceline’s The…

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Food History and Auto-Intertextuality in Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley

Food History and Auto-Intertextuality in Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Dr. Cassie Childs, University of South Florida My project for Intertextual Networks involves creating a digital exhibit that examines the intertextuality between Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley (1696), food history, archival manuscripts, and Manley’s later writing, both fiction and non-fiction. The project will develop in two stages: the first phase will engage with material history by annotating the primary text…

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Cavendish X Molière: Braiding The Politics of Inter-Gender Dialogue

Cavendish X Molière: Braiding The Politics of Inter-Gender Dialogue

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Arnaud Zimmern, Ph.D. Candidate in English, University of Notre Dame Were it but for matters of language—that Margaret Cavendish’s French was, like Molière’s English, non-existent—the titular resonance between her 1662 The Female Academy and his 1662 L’Ecole des femmes would defy coincidence. Similarly, the ambitions for all-female education and for celibate female autonomy at stake in her 1668 The Convent…

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