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Category: Word vectors

“A Most Illustrious and Distinctive Career”

“A Most Illustrious and Distinctive Career”

By Becky Standard This post is part of a series we will be publishing with projects from the July 2019 Institutes Series: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist. For more information on the seminar, see here.  In July 2019 I was selected to attend the workshop “Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist” expertly hosted by the Women Writers Project (WWP) at Northeastern University. Funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities made it possible for me to travel to Boston…

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A Word Embedding Model of One’s Own: Modern Fiction from Materialism to Spiritualism

A Word Embedding Model of One’s Own: Modern Fiction from Materialism to Spiritualism

By James Clawson This post is part of a series we will be publishing with projects from the July 2019 Institutes Series: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist. For more information on the seminar, see here.  Woolf’s essays heading into the third decade of the 20th century — especially “Modern Fiction,” “Mr. Bennet and Mrs. Brown,” and “The Russian Point of View” — show her interest in the changing shape of literature of the time, especially as it related to…

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Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works

Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works

By Caterina Agostini This post is part of a series we will be publishing with projects from the July 2019 Institutes Series: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist. For more information on the seminar, see here.  Corpus, Methods, and Guidelines The objects of my research are scientific thinking, language, and modes of communication from 1543 to the 1630s, when astronomer Copernicus, physician Vesalius, scientist Galileo, and numerous others published texts which, from a modern perspective, mark the starting point of…

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Beyond the “Box”: Archival Descriptions of LGBT Collections

Beyond the “Box”: Archival Descriptions of LGBT Collections

One of the interesting intersections of digital humanities scholarship and library science is the use and description of archival records. With the increase of digital materials and information comes a proliferation of digital records and corresponding data. As scholars continue to understand the ways text as data can be conceptualized, defined, quantified, and visualized in the humanities, textual records and metadata are similar topics of recent scholarship. In “The Reconfiguration of the Archive as Data to Be Mined,” Michael Moss,…

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Should Giants be Denied Credit? Or, An Examination of Seventeenth-century Historiographies Using Word Embedding Models

Should Giants be Denied Credit? Or, An Examination of Seventeenth-century Historiographies Using Word Embedding Models

Giants were a serious problem for early modern British historians. For example, in a chapter titled “Whether it be likely that there were ever any Gyaunts inhabiting in this Isle or not” from his “Historical Description of the Island of Britain,” William Harrison offers a lengthy meditation on the historical plausibility of giants, arguing against the idea that the presence of fables in a nation’s historical record should irredeemably discredit that nation’s history. Harrison writes that to “some mens eares,”…

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