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Category: Encoding Explorations

The Almanacs of Sarah Jinner and Mary Holden and their Connection to Female Healthcare

The Almanacs of Sarah Jinner and Mary Holden and their Connection to Female Healthcare

By Grace O’Mara, WWP Research and Encoding Specialist and PEAK Award Recipient The Goal Over the past four months, I have spent my time researching Sarah Jinner’s 1659 almanac “An Almanack and Prognostication for the Year of our Lord 1659 being the Third After Bissextile Or Leap Year: Calculated for the Meridian of London, and may Differently Serve for England, Scotland, and Ireland / by Sarah Jinner Student in Astrology” and Mary Holden’s 1688 title “The Women’s Almanack for the…

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Challenging Colonial Discourse Through TEI Markup in Maria Callcott’s “Letters”

Challenging Colonial Discourse Through TEI Markup in Maria Callcott’s “Letters”

By Jacob Murel In his book The Cult of Emptiness: The Western Discovery of Buddhist Thought and the Invention of Oriental Philosophy (2012), Urs App tells the story of the sixteenth-century murderer Anjirō (also, Yajirō) who fled Japan and joined the Jesuit order in Malacca. After being baptized and instructed in the Christian faith under Francis Xavier, Anjirō returned to Japan as a translator between the Jesuit missionaries and Japan’s Buddhist community. Anjirō’s respective descriptions of Buddhism to the Malaccan…

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The “TEI_customization” for writing TEI customizations

The “TEI_customization” for writing TEI customizations

By Syd Bauman This blog post describes the history behind and recent release of the “tei_customization” schema available in the oXygen TEI framework.  As many readers of this blog already know, the Text Encoding Initiative schema is designed to be customized by its users. The customization process enables individual projects or user communities to alter the TEI’s constraints and make them more restrictive, more permissive, or just plain different. While the strategic value of such customization is a subject of…

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Breaking Down Markup Revision Projects: An Approach for Adding Line Breaks to Encoded Documents

Breaking Down Markup Revision Projects: An Approach for Adding Line Breaks to Encoded Documents

In this blog post, we describe the WWP’s solution to a problem that other projects may well face: inserting encoding for line breaks after a text has been transcribed. Here is a lightly edited transcript of an interview Kyle Wholey (Outreach Coordinator at the WWP) conducted with Syd Bauman (Senior XML Programmer-Analyst) and Sarah Connell (Assistant Director).   So what exactly was the problem you worked on here? Sarah: We recently discovered an issue with a text that had been…

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WWP Alumni: Susie Hansley

WWP Alumni: Susie Hansley

Here is the fourth installment in our new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. Kyle Wholey, Outreach Coordinator, interviewed WWP alumna Susie Hansley (Encoder) about her time at the WWP.   How did you get involved with the WWP? There was a job ad posted somewhere for encoders, and I applied. This was way back in my first year of graduate school (1992-1993). At that time, the WWP was in the basement of the…

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WWP Alumni: Ceillie Clark-Keane

WWP Alumni: Ceillie Clark-Keane

Here is the third installment from our new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. Ceillie Clark-Keane (Encoder, 2014–2015) shares some memories from her time at the WWP. During the first semester of my Master’s program, Dr. Julia Flanders visited my class to discuss digital humanities, the Women Writers Project, and, specifically, TEI. We spent the class learning text encoding and beginning a mark-up project that we had to complete for the following week….

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WWP Alumni: Carole Mah

WWP Alumni: Carole Mah

Here is the second installment from our new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. Carole Mah (Programmer/Analyst, 1993–1999) shares some memories from her time at the WWP. I first became involved with the WWP circa 1990/1991, long before people used phrases like “women in STEM.” While a student at Brown, I was working several jobs, including one at the computing lab help desk. Having become dismayed with the patriarchal nature of help desk…

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Interpreting Insights: Reflecting on Numerical Analyses of Women Writers Online Citations 

Interpreting Insights: Reflecting on Numerical Analyses of Women Writers Online Citations 

This is a post in a series authored by our encoding team on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Adam Mazel, WWP and DSG Research Collaborator, Northeastern University What are some of the challenges of interpreting computer-generated literary statistics? In this blog post, I respond to this question by reflecting on my process of computationally analyzing textual citations in Women Writers Online (WWO), a collection of digitized writing in English by women between 1526 and 1850. These citations are…

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Genre and Gender Differences

Genre and Gender Differences

This is a post in a series authored by our encoding team on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Kenneth Oravetz, WWP Research Fellow, Northeastern University I joined the Women Writers Project to create a genre taxonomy for the Intertextual Networks bibliography, a bibliography of all of the works cited in the early modern texts in the Women Writers Online collection. I wrote a bit about the process behind creating that taxonomy here. With the taxonomy in place,…

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Tackling Biblical Referencing in the WWO Archive with TEI markup

Tackling Biblical Referencing in the WWO Archive with TEI markup

This is a post in a series authored by our encoders on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Molly Nebiolo, Research and Encoding Specialist, Intertextual Networks, Northeastern University One of the distinctive features of a collection of early modern texts is the large amount of biblical references and quotes. For the Women Writers Online corpus, this is particularly evident. There are approximately 3,800 biblical references throughout the WWO collection, each of which have been tagged with the elements <regMe> (or…

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