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Author: Anjelica Oswald

Entity Linking Research Paper Works with WWO Data

Entity Linking Research Paper Works with WWO Data

We are thrilled to share the publication of From Zero to Hero: Human-In-The-Loop Entity Linking in Low Resource Domains by Jan-Christoph Klie, Richard Eckart de Castilho, and Iryna Gurevych. The project focused on improving entity linking (EL) annotation by presenting a Human-In-The-Loop annotation approach to speed up the annotation process and make it less tedious.  From Zero to Hero worked with three datasets, including data from Women Writers Online (WWO). Documents from WWO have been annotated with named entities and…

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Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works

Explaining Words, in Nature and Science: Textual Analysis in Galileo’s Works

By Caterina Agostini This post is part of a series we will be publishing with projects from the July 2019 Institutes Series: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist. For more information on the seminar, see here.  Corpus, Methods, and Guidelines The objects of my research are scientific thinking, language, and modes of communication from 1543 to the 1630s, when astronomer Copernicus, physician Vesalius, scientist Galileo, and numerous others published texts which, from a modern perspective, mark the starting point of…

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The WWP begins research on the representation of racial identities in early women’s writing

The WWP begins research on the representation of racial identities in early women’s writing

We are excited to announce that the WWP has begun work on a new project, “Representing Racial Identity in Early Women’s Writing,” funded by a Northeastern University TIER 1 grant awarded to professors Julia Flanders and Nicole Aljoe.  This project will develop new text encoding protocols and prototype data visualizations with attention to the representation of race in the Women Writers Online collection of early women’s texts. We will also convene an international group of scholars who work in critical…

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New reviews added to Women Writers in Review

New reviews added to Women Writers in Review

We’re excited to share that we’ve added six new reviews to Women Writers in Review (WWiR), a collection of close to 700 eighteenth- and nineteenth-century reviews, publication notices, literary histories, and other texts responding to works in Women Writers Online (WWO).  WWiR is always open access and can be used as a resource for research and teaching—or just for fun.  For those wanting to teach with the collection, we have a series of guides and assignments:  Teaching with Women Writers…

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New interactive visualization of “The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson”

New interactive visualization of “The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson”

We are delighted to share this new interactive visualization of The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition, a collaboration between editors Noelle A. Baker and Sandra Harbert Petrulionis and the Women Writers project to edit, transcribe, and encode Emerson’s Almanacks for publication in Women Writers Online (WWO).  Based on code created by Sarah Campell and Zheng-yan Yu, this interactive visualization interface was developed as part of the Intertextual Networks project, a three-year research initiative funded in part…

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Women Writers Online is free for the month of March

Women Writers Online is free for the month of March

Update: We know that many classes have been disrupted due to the COVID-19 outbreak, so we wanted to share that we will be keeping Women Writers Online free until April 17th. We are thrilled to announce that Women Writers Online (WWO) will once again be free during the month of March in celebration of Women’s History Month. The collection contains more than 420 texts written and translated by women published between 1526 and 1850.  We also invite you to explore…

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The “TEI_customization” for writing TEI customizations

The “TEI_customization” for writing TEI customizations

By Syd Bauman This blog post describes the history behind and recent release of the “tei_customization” schema available in the oXygen TEI framework.  As many readers of this blog already know, the Text Encoding Initiative schema is designed to be customized by its users. The customization process enables individual projects or user communities to alter the TEI’s constraints and make them more restrictive, more permissive, or just plain different. While the strategic value of such customization is a subject of…

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WWP in Images: Events, Celebrations, and Outreach

WWP in Images: Events, Celebrations, and Outreach

By Kyle Wholey, Anjelica Oswald, and Julia Flanders This is the second post in our new series celebrating the Women Writers Project’s 30th anniversary by featuring images from the project’s history.  Since 1988, the WWP has focused on collaborative projects that involve faculty, students, and the community of those interested in early women’s writing and text encoding. Through these various collaborations, the WWP has expanded both our community and our collection of texts. Here, we cover the outreach materials that…

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