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Month: July 2019

Beyond the “Box”: Archival Descriptions of LGBT Collections

Beyond the “Box”: Archival Descriptions of LGBT Collections

One of the interesting intersections of digital humanities scholarship and library science is the use and description of archival records. With the increase of digital materials and information comes a proliferation of digital records and corresponding data. As scholars continue to understand the ways text as data can be conceptualized, defined, quantified, and visualized in the humanities, textual records and metadata are similar topics of recent scholarship. In “The Reconfiguration of the Archive as Data to Be Mined,” Michael Moss,…

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WWP Alumni: Josephine Sloman

WWP Alumni: Josephine Sloman

Here is the fifth installment in our new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. WWP alumna Josephine Sloman (Encoder) speaks about her time at the WWP and her career after graduating from Northeastern.  My first introduction to the WWP was during my sophomore year. It was my first semester as an English major—I initially came to Northeastern with the intention of majoring in Psychology and Neuroscience. I was in Dr. Nicole Aljoe’s Introduction to English Studies…

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Should Giants be Denied Credit? Or, An Examination of Seventeenth-century Historiographies Using Word Embedding Models

Should Giants be Denied Credit? Or, An Examination of Seventeenth-century Historiographies Using Word Embedding Models

Giants were a serious problem for early modern British historians. For example, in a chapter titled “Whether it be likely that there were ever any Gyaunts inhabiting in this Isle or not” from his “Historical Description of the Island of Britain,” William Harrison offers a lengthy meditation on the historical plausibility of giants, arguing against the idea that the presence of fables in a nation’s historical record should irredeemably discredit that nation’s history. Harrison writes that to “some mens eares,”…

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