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Author: Sarah Connell

New WWP Series on Early Women’s Intertextual Networks

New WWP Series on Early Women’s Intertextual Networks

We are delighted to announce the launch of our new Intertextual Networks series on the open-access Women Writers in Context platform! Intertextual Networks is a three-year research project funded by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities, focusing on intertextuality in early women’s writing. This collaborative research initiative examines the citation and quotation practices of the authors represented in Women Writers Online (WWO) to explore and theorize the representation of intertextuality. As part of this project, we…

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WWP Alumni: Josephine Sloman

WWP Alumni: Josephine Sloman

Here is the fifth installment in our new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. WWP alumna Josephine Sloman (Encoder) speaks about her time at the WWP and her career after graduating from Northeastern.  My first introduction to the WWP was during my sophomore year. It was my first semester as an English major—I initially came to Northeastern with the intention of majoring in Psychology and Neuroscience. I was in Dr. Nicole Aljoe’s Introduction to English Studies…

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Should Giants be Denied Credit? Or, An Examination of Seventeenth-century Historiographies Using Word Embedding Models

Should Giants be Denied Credit? Or, An Examination of Seventeenth-century Historiographies Using Word Embedding Models

Giants were a serious problem for early modern British historians. For example, in a chapter titled “Whether it be likely that there were ever any Gyaunts inhabiting in this Isle or not” from his “Historical Description of the Island of Britain,” William Harrison offers a lengthy meditation on the historical plausibility of giants, arguing against the idea that the presence of fables in a nation’s historical record should irredeemably discredit that nation’s history. Harrison writes that to “some mens eares,”…

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Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

We are delighted to announce that Women Writers Online will once again be free during the month of March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. This collection includes more than 400 texts written and translated by women, first published between 1526 and 1850. We also invite you to explore our other publications, which are always open access. These include Women Writers in Review (WWiR), a collection of close to 700 reviews of and responses to works by the works in…

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Women Writers Online: Free in March 2019 & Teaching Resources

Women Writers Online: Free in March 2019 & Teaching Resources

We are pleased to announce that Women Writers Online will once again be free for the month of March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. This collection includes more than 400 texts written and translated by women, first published between 1526 and 1850 (for the current list of texts in WWO see here). We can also share some resources developed by our teaching partners, and circulate a call for those who are interested in joining the teaching partners program with…

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Stylometry and Women Writers Online

Stylometry and Women Writers Online

By Molly Nebiolo, Research and Encoding Specialist I was able to fly to Victoria, British Columbia to to attend DHSI 2018 thanks to a course waiver awarded by DHSI and a NuLab Seedling Grant that funded my transportation and housing for the class. Details on my experience with DHSI can be read here. Stylometry is a way to compare the similarity of texts in vector space and visualize those connections or changes between authors, over time, or across genres. The…

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Ways of Reading: Women Writers in Review, Word Tree, and Digital Humanities Praxis

Ways of Reading: Women Writers in Review, Word Tree, and Digital Humanities Praxis

By Jason M. Payton, Sam Houston State University Note: Jason M. Payton is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. He will be joining the faculty of the Department of English at the University of Georgia in the fall of 2018. During the Spring 2018 semester, my early American literature survey course completed a two-phase assignment sequence designed to familiarize students with the broad aims of Women Writers in Review and to introduce them to digital humanities tools and practices. The first phase of the assignment…

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Reflection: Context Website Project

Reflection: Context Website Project

By Amanda Barnett, Texas Christian University Note: Amanda Barnett is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. Read the assignment discussed below here and see the syllabus here. Drafting: When I was assigned the Introduction to Women’s Writing course for Spring 2018 I was excited to create something new and, wanting to insert something of my own expertise, I decided that we would spend the semester discussing representations of professional women in literature of all kinds. Because this class is technically at the sophomore level, but…

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Literary Exceptionalism, Literary Community: Mary Wroth in Context

Literary Exceptionalism, Literary Community: Mary Wroth in Context

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Amanda Henrichs, Amherst College In my previous post for the Intertextual Networks project, I outlined some of the background of the Sidney family and of my planned contribution to the project; briefly, scholarship on the women of the Sidney family accepts as fact a strong literary relationship between Mary Wroth and her aunt Mary Sidney Herbert. Wroth is mostly clearly influenced…

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New Visualization of Names in WWO

New Visualization of Names in WWO

We are so excited to share a new visualization, developed by Sarah Campbell and Zheng-yan Yu as part of Professor Cody Dunne’s Special Topics in Data Visualization course. As the “About” page explains, the visualization shows where the top twenty most common person names, place names, and organization names appear: This data was queried from the Women Writers Online textbase and includes metadata for each of the 401 texts as well as three in-text elements. Multiple values for each element can exist in…

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