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Women Writers Online: Free in March 2019 & Teaching Resources

Women Writers Online: Free in March 2019 & Teaching Resources

We are pleased to announce that Women Writers Online will once again be free for the month of March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. This collection includes more than 400 texts written and translated by women, first published between 1526 and 1850 (for the current list of texts in WWO see here). We can also share some resources developed by our teaching partners, and circulate a call for those who are interested in joining the teaching partners program with…

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Stylometry and Women Writers Online

Stylometry and Women Writers Online

By Molly Nebiolo, Research and Encoding Specialist I was able to fly to Victoria, British Columbia to to attend DHSI 2018 thanks to a course waiver awarded by DHSI and a NuLab Seedling Grant that funded my transportation and housing for the class. Details on my experience with DHSI can be read here. Stylometry is a way to compare the similarity of texts in vector space and visualize those connections or changes between authors, over time, or across genres. The…

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Ways of Reading: Women Writers in Review, Word Tree, and Digital Humanities Praxis

Ways of Reading: Women Writers in Review, Word Tree, and Digital Humanities Praxis

By Jason M. Payton, Sam Houston State University Note: Jason M. Payton is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. He will be joining the faculty of the Department of English at the University of Georgia in the fall of 2018. During the Spring 2018 semester, my early American literature survey course completed a two-phase assignment sequence designed to familiarize students with the broad aims of Women Writers in Review and to introduce them to digital humanities tools and practices. The first phase of the assignment…

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Reflection: Context Website Project

Reflection: Context Website Project

By Amanda Barnett, Texas Christian University Note: Amanda Barnett is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. Read the assignment discussed below here and see the syllabus here. Drafting: When I was assigned the Introduction to Women’s Writing course for Spring 2018 I was excited to create something new and, wanting to insert something of my own expertise, I decided that we would spend the semester discussing representations of professional women in literature of all kinds. Because this class is technically at the sophomore level, but…

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Literary Exceptionalism, Literary Community: Mary Wroth in Context

Literary Exceptionalism, Literary Community: Mary Wroth in Context

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Amanda Henrichs, Amherst College In my previous post for the Intertextual Networks project, I outlined some of the background of the Sidney family and of my planned contribution to the project; briefly, scholarship on the women of the Sidney family accepts as fact a strong literary relationship between Mary Wroth and her aunt Mary Sidney Herbert. Wroth is mostly clearly influenced…

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New Visualization of Names in WWO

New Visualization of Names in WWO

We are so excited to share a new visualization, developed by Sarah Campbell and Zheng-yan Yu as part of Professor Cody Dunne’s Special Topics in Data Visualization course. As the “About” page explains, the visualization shows where the top twenty most common person names, place names, and organization names appear: This data was queried from the Women Writers Online textbase and includes metadata for each of the 401 texts as well as three in-text elements. Multiple values for each element can exist in…

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“My Master” : Interracial colonial encounters in Women Writers Online

“My Master” : Interracial colonial encounters in Women Writers Online

By Elizabeth Polcha, English Department PhD Candidate and WWP Research & Encoding Specialist This publication set calls attention to the complexity of settler colonialism and imperialism in women’s writing between the early eighteenth and the mid nineteenth-centuries, particularly in regards to representations of interracial relations. One of the earliest texts in this set, Elizabeth Hanson’s God’s Mercy Surmounting Man’s Cruelty (1728), is a captivity narrative in which Hanson shows both gratitude and affection for the indigenous people who have taken…

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WWO Free for the Month of March

WWO Free for the Month of March

We are delighted to announce that Women Writers Online will once again be free during the month of March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. This collection includes almost 400 texts written and translated by women, first published between 1526 and 1850. We also invite you to explore our other publications, which are always open access. These include Women Writers in Review (WWiR), a collection of close to 700 reviews of and responses to works by the works in WWO,…

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LIT 200, Legacy, and Women Writers Online: Using Digital Collections as Interpretive Tools

LIT 200, Legacy, and Women Writers Online: Using Digital Collections as Interpretive Tools

By Amanda Stuckey, York College of Pennsylvania Note: Amanda Stuckey is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. For my Fall 2017 LIT 200 Literary and Textual Analysis course, I wanted to combine coursework with a project I’ve taken on as the Digital Coordinator for Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, the only scholarly journal to focus specifically on recovering American women’s writing, broadly defined, from the seventeenth through the early twentieth centuries. During the coming year, I aim to…

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Spring Practicum Series

Spring Practicum Series

We’re delighted to share the spring dates for the WWP’s practicum series of two-hour workshops focused on particular skills and tools. Each session will be held from 12 to 2pm in the Digital Scholarship Commons in Snell Library. In the spring, we will be offering: February 5: An XPath Excursion. This session will cover the basics of exploring and querying XML documents using XPath; we will navigate the document tree, limit our results to meet specific criteria, and discuss ways to…

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