Research with WWP Data at the AI/Machine Learning Research Bootcamp

Research with WWP Data at the AI/Machine Learning Research Bootcamp

By Haripriya Mehta, Co-founder, MehtA+  In Summer 2022, 15 high school students from all over the world participated in MehtA+’s AI/Machine Learning Research Bootcamp and learned the theory and application of machine learning. Students learned various AI/Machine Learning models including KNN, support vector machines, artificial neural networks, and topics in computer vision and natural language processing.  The students put their newfound knowledge into practice through an exploratory week-long midterm project. The objective of the midterm was to predict the gender of the…

Read More Read More

Using encoding to teach textual analysis

Using encoding to teach textual analysis

By Jessica Kane, Visiting Assistant Professor of English at Albion College This collaboration was part of the WWP’s Teaching Partners program; for more information, see the digital edition created by the students or watch this short video on the project.  Eliza Haywood’s novella “Fantomina” (1725) begins by introducing the reader to “A YOUNG Lady of distinguished Birth, Beauty, Wit, and Spirit” (258) who creates four different personas, seduces the same man four different times, and ends up banished to a convent…

Read More Read More

Craven’s Journey: NULab Research Project

Craven’s Journey: NULab Research Project

By Colleen Nugent, Ph.D. student, History For my NULab research project, I worked with the Women Writers Project at Northeastern. My overall goal was to add more context to a WWO text by providing map visualization to accompany a travel narrative. Before I could start on this project, I first had to learn text encoding using XML and TEI in Oxygen. I was embedded into the WWP as a text encoder, and fully encoded a text of my own before I began learning…

Read More Read More

Announcing the launch of Women Writers: Intertextual Networks

Announcing the launch of Women Writers: Intertextual Networks

We are very excited to announce a new open-access research tool! Women Writers: Intertextual Networks is the result of a three-year project focusing on intertextuality in early women’s writing. This collaborative research initiative examined the citation and quotation practices of the authors represented in Women Writers Online (WWO) to explore and theorize the representation of intertextuality, and to study the ways in which early women writers named, cited, quoted, and remixed texts by other authors. We identified and encoded each of…

Read More Read More

Exploring English Translations of the Passover Haggadah in Word2Vec

Exploring English Translations of the Passover Haggadah in Word2Vec

By Avraham Roos This post is part of a series we will be publishing with projects from the WWP’s Institutes Series: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist. This post is excerpted from Avraham Roos’s dissertation, “Why is This Translation Different from All Other Translations? A Linguistic and Cultural-Historical Analysis of English Translations of the Passover Haggadah from 1770 to Now.”     Former Google-employee Thomas Mikolov and colleagues introduced “Word2Vec” (Mikolov et al. 2013), a tool for learning continuous word embeddings…

Read More Read More

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March

We are delighted to announce that Women Writers Online (WWO) will once again be free during the month of March in celebration of Women’s History Month. The collection contains more than 430 texts written and translated by women, published between 1526 and 1850. We also invite you to explore our other publications, which are always open access. These include Women Writers in Review (WWiR), a collection of close to 700 reviews of and responses to works in WWO, and Women…

Read More Read More

Are the romantics to blame? Exploring the WWP WordVectors Code as a Word Vectors Novice

Are the romantics to blame? Exploring the WWP WordVectors Code as a Word Vectors Novice

By Emily Miller Leading up to the July 2021 Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist workshop, I’d been doing some work with the WWP website and incubating a fledgling word2vec project as part of my work on the Graduate Certificate in Digital Humanities here at Northeastern. The workshop approached, and the R files were prepared and polished. All that was left was to give them a road test. As someone new-ish to DH and learning these tools for my own project,…

Read More Read More

Representing Race in the Early Modern Archive

Representing Race in the Early Modern Archive

By Cailin Roles Here at the Women Writers Project, our central work is text encoding: we encode works in English or English translation by women before 1850 in XML, following the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI). In 2020, the WWP expanded to include a new, internally-funded collaborative project, which asks whether and how digital collections of historical texts can represent racial identity. Building on the work of scholars like Kim Hall (1995), Brigitte Fielder (2020), and Jessica Marie Johnson (2020), we…

Read More Read More

Experiments in Tokenization for Word Embedding Models

Experiments in Tokenization for Word Embedding Models

By Juniper Johnson During my time as the 2019–2020 NULab Coordinator, I extended my previous research experience with the Women Writers Project to build an XSLT script for tokenizing element content for the Women Writers Vector Toolkit (WWVT). The WWVT is an online laboratory for learning about and experimenting with word embedding models and features over 20 models created using the Women Writers Online (WWO) corpus and parallel corpora created from the Text Creation Partnership collections. The WWVT models are…

Read More Read More

The Almanacs of Sarah Jinner and Mary Holden and their Connection to Female Healthcare

The Almanacs of Sarah Jinner and Mary Holden and their Connection to Female Healthcare

By Grace O’Mara, WWP Research and Encoding Specialist and PEAK Award Recipient The Goal Over the past four months, I have spent my time researching Sarah Jinner’s 1659 almanac “An Almanack and Prognostication for the Year of our Lord 1659 being the Third After Bissextile Or Leap Year: Calculated for the Meridian of London, and may Differently Serve for England, Scotland, and Ireland / by Sarah Jinner Student in Astrology” and Mary Holden’s 1688 title “The Women’s Almanack for the…

Read More Read More