The preposterous publication history of Elizabeth I’s “Golden Speech”

The preposterous publication history of Elizabeth I’s “Golden Speech”

This is a post in a series authored by our research collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here. By Kristen Abbott Bennett, Framingham State University Working in the Women Writers Online (WWO) collection, I encountered variants of Elizabeth’s “Golden Speech” presenting apparently mismatched titles and contents. For example, an initial search of the WWO collection produces two variants of Elizabeth’s “Speech to Her Last Parliament” (1642) and “Last Speech and Thanks” (1679), yet each text echoes, in varying…

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Breaking Down Markup Revision Projects: An Approach for Adding Line Breaks to Encoded Documents

Breaking Down Markup Revision Projects: An Approach for Adding Line Breaks to Encoded Documents

In this blog post, we describe the WWP’s solution to a problem that other projects may well face: inserting encoding for line breaks after a text has been transcribed. Here is a lightly edited transcript of an interview Kyle Wholey (Outreach Coordinator at the WWP) conducted with Syd Bauman (Senior XML Programmer-Analyst) and Sarah Connell (Assistant Director).   So what exactly was the problem you worked on here? Sarah: We recently discovered an issue with a text that had been…

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WWP Alumni: Susie Hansley

WWP Alumni: Susie Hansley

Here is the fourth installment in our new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. Kyle Wholey, Outreach Coordinator, interviewed  WWP alumni Susie Hansley (Encoder) about her time at the WWP.   How did you get involved with the WWP? There was a job ad posted somewhere for encoders, and I applied. This was way back in my first year of graduate school (1992-1993). At that time, the WWP was in the basement of…

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Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

We are delighted to announce that Women Writers Online will once again be free during the month of March, in celebration of Women’s History Month. This collection includes more than 400 texts written and translated by women, first published between 1526 and 1850. We also invite you to explore our other publications, which are always open access. These include Women Writers in Review (WWiR), a collection of close to 700 reviews of and responses to works by the works in…

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WWP Alumni: Ceillie Clark-Keane

WWP Alumni: Ceillie Clark-Keane

Here is the third installment from our new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. Ceillie Clark-Keane (Encoder, 2014–2015) shares some memories from her time at the WWP. During the first semester of my Master’s program, Dr. Julia Flanders visited my class to discuss digital humanities, the Women Writers Project, and, specifically, TEI. We spent the class learning text encoding and beginning a mark-up project that we had to complete for the following week….

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Call for Participation: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist

Call for Participation: Word Vectors for the Thoughtful Humanist

Applications are invited for participation in a new series of advanced institutes on text analysis, sponsored by the Northeastern University Women Writers Project with generous funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities. These events will introduce teachers and researchers at varied levels of expertise to the text analysis methods and interpretive questions arising from word embedding models, which represent connections between words as computable spatial relationships. These institutes will explore practical techniques and also interpretive outcomes, working with simple,…

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WWP Alumni: Carole Mah

WWP Alumni: Carole Mah

Here is the second installment from our new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. Carole Mah (Programmer/Analyst, 1993–1999) shares some memories from her time at the WWP. I first became involved with the WWP circa 1990/1991, long before people used phrases like “women in STEM.” While a student at Brown, I was working several jobs, including one at the computing lab help desk. Having become dismayed with the patriarchal nature of help desk…

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WWP Alumni: Eléna Rivera

WWP Alumni: Eléna Rivera

To celebrate our thirtieth anniversary, we are launching a new series featuring stories from people who have helped shaped the Women Writers Project. Here, Professor Eléna Rivera (Senior Encoder, 1997–1999) shares some memories from her time at the WWP.  We hope you enjoy the series! I was working at the John Hay Library at Brown University at the time, cataloguing and sorting through manuscript collections, when I saw the job posting for a Lead Encoder and Text Editor at the…

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Text Publication Technologies

Text Publication Technologies

To celebrate our thirtieth anniversary, we are launching a new series featuring images from the WWP’s history throughout the past few decades. We hope you enjoy the series! Since our inception at Brown University in 1988, the Women Writers Project has worked with various methods of publishing early women’s texts. We’ve used many different technologies and tools to transcribe, encode, proof, and publish 411 texts by women between 1526 and 1850 as of winter 2018. We’ve encoded these texts from…

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Teaching Editing in an Undergraduate Women Writers Classroom

Teaching Editing in an Undergraduate Women Writers Classroom

By Liza Blake, University of Toronto Note: Liza Blake is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. This write-up makes reference to the following four files: a syllabus, and three assignment sheets: EWW1; EWW2; and EWW3. CONTEXT AND GOALS This post will describe a three-part “Editing Women Writers” set of scaffolded assignments that I used in my undergraduate course “Early Modern Women Writers” in the University of Toronto Mississauga (UTM)’s Spring term of 2018. The class’s evaluation was divided: half of the grades came from more typical…

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