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Acknowledgments

The editors, Sandra H. Petrulionis and Noelle Baker, would like to acknowledge the support of the Ralph Waldo Emerson Fund, the Ralph Waldo Emerson Memorial Association, Pennsylvania State University, Altoona, Harvard University’s Houghton Library, and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this edition do not necessarily reflect those of the NEH.

HM470b GTF38,S568;1 BP1

568

pre() post()The obligation of the precepts con- notaind in new tes testament continus so long as the reasons on w’h which they were founded continue, & ceases when the observation of any particular precept is inconsistent with another of a more general nature, or of greater importance for for promoting the eſsential branches of virtue. Doddridges lectures

If one of our Socinian writers had said this, I should have tho’t thought it a latidunarian latitudinarian sentiment of a most dangerous nature. Dod can hardly swallow it now.

His ““demonstration”” is thus, “1. Many precepts are delivered in such manner, as that they must neſsecerily admit of some exception, in order to reconcile them with each other, & with the natural law of God, founded on the mutual & immutable relation of things. 2. The law of Moses which is deliverd in as general & universal a stile as the precepts of Christ was in some instances violated without any crime by those who were still in general under the oblgations of that law”

handwriting the handwriting original in- notellectual handwriting series of great value to which the Romans lay un nodisputed claim

I think the only ““forms”” worthy of Plato were those abstracted from matter. Tho’ Though Bacon says ““he lost the advantage of his opinion that forms were the true object of knowledge, by grasping at those which were abstrcd abstracted from matter & not as determined in it.”” whence he turned to theological opinn opinion & thence infected all his nat. natural phi. philosophy Did he ex- nopect to find forms in theology 1821~-08-20 Au. August 20

Numa Pompilius gaind from Egerian greece

Time an affection of motion of w’h which God is Author That kind of life which the best & happiest men lead occasionly, in the unobstructed exercise of their powers belongs eternally to God in a degree that should excite admiration in proportion as it exceeds comprehension. He began with proving pop. popular covicts convictions in ye the exercise of moral & intell. intellectual nature virtues happiness is energy directed in true virtue—totally different from yt that w’h which regards morality founded solely or ultimately on feeling; whether a moral sense, sympathy or any other modification of merely sensitive nature; liable to gross abuse Familiar with the correct geometry of his times, he descerned the concatination of triths truths w’h which , being linked indissolubly together unite the most distant & aparent extremes.

Aristotle said all our direct knowledge originates in perceptions of sense

handwriting pre() post()is unanimously agreed by all astronomers, that several 1000s years must pass before any such situation of the stars, as they would imajine can twice happen; and it is very certain that the state in which the heavens will be tomorrow has never yet been since the creation of the world Rollin

HM470 GTF38,S568;3 BP2

Hamilton, 1821-031821. March #gtI read for the first time the solution or rather the #gtproposition of that couler color is not in mind but the substance #gtwhic h reflects it. For many long years pestered with the handwritings & Addison hypothesis. And tho’ though I dare not say as Reid #gtha s said that the rose is red when no one sees it yet I have said it to myself. “The dissimilitude of our sensations & feelings to external things is the innocent Mother of those frightfull progeny—that terminates in saying that there exists nothing but ideas & impressions— that there are no causes nor effects; no substances ma noterial or spiritual; no evidencee even in mathematical demon nostration; no liberty nor active power; nothing existing in na noture but impressions & ideas following each other with noout time or place or subject.” He says too that pre()the ex nopectation of the connection of two events is not an aſsocia notion of ideas but a precsience of mind”

1821-03~-2424 pre()And he calls this prn. principle not the effect of reasoning but an original priciple of hu. human na. nature w’h which he calls the inductive prin. principle The best models of inductive reasoning those of Newtons prinipia principia & opticks drawn from Bacon. The purpose to show us real & apparent connections of things in Nature.”

1821-03~-2727 M. Morning How ridiculous to represent enthu nosiasm as a disease—That light of the soul—that spark of glory which will continue to burn on thro’ through eternity I mean a stronger portion of feeling—perception—exist noence than belongs to the dull & weake. It is heroism in the Soldier—self renunciation in the Statsman—self de novotion in the Martyr—adoration & fruition of existence in the Recluse. Oh it is the appetite of hunger in the soul for knowledge virtue & immotality. That it does not find fuel enough in this clayey world to feed it

1821-03~-2222 Thurs 1821-03~-2323 appt rej rejoiced 1821-03~-2424 equal 1821-03~-2525 sab sabbath 1821-03~-2626 Tol Tolerable 1821-03~-2727 forgot 1821-03~-2828 do ditto 1821-03~-2929 poor 1821-03~-3030 tol tolerable 1821-03~-3131 tol tolerable 1821~-04-01 Ap April 1 sab sabbath Low 1821-04~-022 rode 1821-04~-033 dull 1821-04~-044 do ditto 1821-04~-055 Fast ri. ride 1821-04~-066 good 1821-04~-077 do ditto 1821-04~-088 sab sabbath 1821-04~-099 sad 1821-04~-1010 gay 1821-04~-1111 sad

HM471b GTF38,S568;3continued BP3

The Revwer Reviewer of S. says that S. says that too much stress has been laid on nature of mind— I dont think so. Yet there is fine stuff in the following—pre()the proper use of the doctrine is not to demonstate that the soul is na noturally & phi. philosophically immortal, but to refute the objections that have been urged against the possibility of its seperate state from body” Stuart. Now I would ask what is so good an ar- nogument for its’ seprate exit. existence as being independant of matter? — And if it is not matter it must be spirit as these are all w’h which belong to man, in some of their organisations But S. does not think our knowlege of mind able to af- noford us any positive argument; for we know nothing but that its’ GTF38,S568;4 qualities are essentially different from matter so is its’ nature.— And he thinks the theory of Berkly better than materialism as the latter only contradicts our perctions perceptions “There are various circumtances w’h which take place render it highly probable that the union between soul & body w’h which handwriting takes place in our present state so far from being essential to the our exercise of our powers & faculties was intended to limit the sphere of our information & to keep us ignorant of the nature & govt government of univers in this early stage of our existence. Indeed when we reflect on difference between operations of mind & qualities of body it is more wonderfull that they can be united than to sup nopose the former to exist

HM471 GTF38,S568;2 BP4

The Antients better skilled in morals than phi. philosophy accurate study of sci. science nesseceery to meta. metaphysics nothing more unsettled than unconnected than moral code of Antients— Rank & talents often confounded by many of G. Greek phi. philosophers love of study & first duties classed togather. In their enthusiasm for faculties of mind, they allowed them a place of esteem beyond every thing else—neglectd heart.

Is the fire caught from H. Heaven to be employed in lghting lighting a faggot to keep the cold from the wasted & numbed figers fingers of poverty

Old maids may realize the publick spirit of Plato’s republick—no female attachment.

Ari. says “all will is free will, since nothing can be more free than what is voluntary—” Now why are they voluntary more than others? to me, renders all void, as to perfect freedom—but to all the purposes of reward & punishment.

After Charlemange MMS manuscripts collected with opretuity opportunity He learned greek in age

The Countries whose present lan noguages are of Roman Ori nogin, the latin not truely then considered as dead—till the 9 or 10 Cent. Century Men considered it as alive—used in rilegion & clerties cloisters .

Plato & Socrates prefered conversation to witing writing —they felt that their ideas belonged more to imitation than analysis. wanted inflamaed inflamed ima. imagination as the present Writers Modern & metaphy metaphysicians want to secure their works from poetry.

Abelard Roscelint meaning that As in the common degreee of the intellectual qualities there is no abilities; so in the common degree of the moral, there is no virtue.

Aristotle held that matter might exist without forms but forms could not without matter That there is found In mounful mournful tho’ts thoughts & always my may be fund found A power to viture virtue ‘friendly!’ Words

This and the last page of this Almanack are inscribed in “patchwork” fashion, with triangular-shaped blank spaces in the middle of the text, forming covers for this booklet.

As with the first page of this Almanack, this one is inscribed in “patchwork” fashion, with triangular-shaped blank spaces in the middle of the page.

Written in green pencil in left corner of top margin, likely in non-authorial hand.

MME is quoting Philip Doddridge, Lecture CXCII, in The Works of Rev. P. Doddridge: “The obligation of the precepts contained in New Testament continues so long as the reasons on which they were founded continue, and ceases when the observation of any particular precept is inconsistent with another of a more general nature, or of greater importance for promoting the essential branches of virtue” Doddridge_Works29 Works of the Rev. P. Doddridge Doddridge, mWorks Doddridge Philip Edward Baines Leeds 1802-1805 10 vols. cit pp5:286 .

MME quotes from Lecture CXCII of Philip Doddridge: “2. Dem. 1. Many precepts are delivered in such manner, that they must necessarily admit of some exception, in order to reconcile them with each other, and with the natural law of God, founded on the mutable and immutable relation of things … 2. The law of slant(italic)Moses , which is delivered in as general and universal a stile as the precepts of Christ, was in some instances violated, without any crime, by those who were still in general under the obligations of that law” Doddridge_Works29 Works of the Rev. P. Doddridge Doddridge, mWorks Doddridge Philip Edward Baines Leeds 1802-1805 10 vols. cit pp5:286 .

No Tolman transcript is extant for this text.

MME is quoting and paraphrasing Friedrich von Schlegel, Lectures on the History of Literature, Ancient and Modern: “The classical period of Roman literature, then, reckoning from the consulate of Cicero till the death of Trajan, included no more than one hundred and eighty years. Within the same period also the science of jurisprudence, the only original intellectual possession of great value to which the Romans can lay undisputed claim, received its first development, and began to assume the appearance of a science” Schlegel_Lectures127 Lectures on the History of Literature, Ancient and Modern Schlegel, mLectures Schlegel Friedrich von translator Lockhart John Gibson Thomas Dobson and Son Philadelphia 1818 2 vols. cit pp1:159 .

MME is misquoting Francis Bacon: “But it is manifest, that Plato, in his opinion of ideas as one that had a wit of elevation situate as upon a cliff, did decry ‘That forms were the true object of knowledge;’ but lost the real fruit of his opinion, by considering of forms as absolutely abstracted from matter, and not confined and determined by matter; and so turning his opinion upon theology, wherewith all his natural philosophy is infected” Bacon_Advancement3 Advancement of Learning Bacon, mAdvancement Bacon Francis Ward, Lock, and Co. London 1800 cit pp72 .

MME likely refers to Numa Pompilius’s reputed consort and advisor, the Italian water nymph Egeria. For the insurance of easy deliveries, pregnant women made sacrifices to Egeria ) is ?> NA_Numa_Pompilius98 Numa Pompilius Howatson M.C. Oxford Companion to Classical Literature aNuma Pompilius Oxford University Press 2011 cit .

MME is commonplacing Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, Comprising his Practical Philosophy, Translated from the Greek as translated by John Gillies: “The Divinity … ever is what he is, existing in energy before time began, since time is only an affection of motion, of which God is the author. That kind of life which the best and happiest of men lead occasionally, in unobstructed exercise of their highest powers, belongs eternally to God in a degree that should excite admiration in proportion as it surpasses comprehension” Gillies_Aristotles_Ethics42 Aristotle’sEthics and Politics, Comprising his Practical Philosophy, Translated from the Greek. . . Gillies, mAristotle's Ethics Aristotle translator Gillies John T. Cadell and W. Davies London 1813 2 vols. cit pp1:155 .

MME is commonplacing Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, Comprising his Practical Philosophy, Translated from the Greek, as translated by John Gillies: “He began by proving that the happiness of man consists in the exercise of the moral and intellectual virtues; or, in his own technical language, ‘that happiness is energy directed in the line of virtue.’…This system is totally different from that which regards morality as founded solely or ultimately on feeling, whether a moral sense, sympathy, or any other modification of merely sensitive nature; an absurd doctrine, liable to gross and dangerous perversion; and which has often been employed to justify, and even to produce the wildest practical errors”; and “Familiar with the correct geometry of his times, he discerned the concatenation of truths, which, being linked indissolubly together, unite the most distant, and seemingly unconnected extremes” Gillies_Aristotles_Ethics42 Aristotle’sEthics and Politics, Comprising his Practical Philosophy, Translated from the Greek. . . Gillies, mAristotle's Ethics Aristotle translator Gillies John T. Cadell and W. Davies London 1813 2 vols. cit pp1:290, 131 .

MME is commonplacing slant(italic)Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics, Comprising his Practical Philosophy, Translated from the Greek, as translated by John Gillies: “It is the doctrine of Aristotle, a doctrine long and obstinately disputed, but now very generally received, that all our direct knowledge originates from sense” Gillies_Aristotles_Ethics42 Aristotle’sEthics and Politics, Comprising his Practical Philosophy, Translated from the Greek. . . Gillies, mAristotle's Ethics Aristotle translator Gillies John T. Cadell and W. Davies London 1813 2 vols. cit pp1:46 . No Tolman transcript is extant for this text.

MME is quoting Charles Rollin: “Now, it is unanimously agreed by all astronomers, that several thousands of years must pass, before any such situation of the stars, as they would imagine, can twice happen; and it is very certain, that the state in which the heavens will be to-morrow has never yet been since the creation of the world” Rollin_Ancient_History121 Ancient History of the Egyptians, Carthaginians, Assyrians, Babylonians, Medes and Persians, Macedonians, and Grecians Rollin, mAncient History Rollin Charles Munroe & Francis Boston 1805 8 vols. cit pp2:186-187 . No Tolman transcript is extant for this text.

MME is commonplacing from Thomas Reid, An Inquiry into the Human Mind, on the Principles of Common Sense: “The progeny that followed, is still more frightful; so that is surprising, that one could be found who had the courage to act the midwife, to rear it up, and to usher it into the world. No causes nor effects; no substances, material or spiritual; no evidence even in mathematical demonstration; no liberty nor active power; nothing existing in nature, This but impressions and ideas following each other, without time, place, or subject … The dissimilitude of our sensations and feelings to external things, is the innocent mother of most of them … Now, this can with no propriety be called an association of ideas, unless ideas and belief be one and the same thing. A child has found the prick of a pin conjoined with pain; hence, he believes, and knows, that these things are naturally connected; he knows that the one will always follow the other. If any man will call this only an association of ideas, I dispute not about words, but I think he speaks very improperly. For if we express it in plain English, it is prescience, that things which he hath found conjoined in time past, will be conjoined in time to come. And this prescience is not the effect of reasoning, but of an original principle of human nature, which I have called the inductive principle … the best models of inductive reasoning that have yet appeared, which I take to be the third book of the Principia and the Optics of NEWTON, were drawn from BACON’s rules. The purpose of all those rules, is to teach us to distinguish seeming or apparent connections of things in the course of nature, from such as are real.” MME also references Reid’s explanation of Joseph Addison’s theory “that light and colours, as apprehended by the imagination, are only ideas in the mind, and not qualities that have any existence in matter” Reid_Inquiry117 An Inquiry into the Human Mind, on the Principles of Common Sense Reid, mInquiry Reid Thomas Bell & Bradfute Edinburgh and London 1801 cit pp191, 192, 434, 437, 179 .

MME’s positive conception of “enthusiasm” may be inspired by or responding to Germaine de Staël, whose Influence of Literature upon Society she is reading at this time. In this work, as well as in three chapters dedicated to “enthusiasm” in Germany, de Staël links “a reflected enthusiasm, and a pure exaltation of mind” De_Staël_Influence27 Influence of Literature Upon Society De Staël, mInfluence De Staël-Holstein Anne Louise Germaine W. Wells and T. B. Wait Boston 1813 2 vols. cit pp1:275 , and she asserts that “enthusiasm is connected with the harmony of the universe: it is the love of the beautiful, elevation of soul, enjoyment of devotion”; similar to MME, she also relates this emotion to “men [who] take up arms indeed for the defence of the land which they inhabit . . . inspired by the enthusiasm of their country”; and she asserts that “if the soul be really moved within us, if in the universe it seeks a God, even if it be still sensible to glory and to love, the clouds of heaven will hold converse with it, the torrents will listen to its voice, and the breeze that passes through the grove, seems to deign to whisper to us something of those we love De_Staël_Germany26 Germany De Staël, mGermany De Staël-Holstein Anne Louise Germaine Eastburn, Kirk New York 1814 3 vols. in 2 cit pp2:328, 339, 341-42 . In contrast to De Staël and MME, some post-Enlightenment figures, such as Thomas Reid, whom MME is also reading at this time, assert that “imagination . . . or the most frantic enthusiasm” can be a product of “delirium” Reid_Inquiry117 An Inquiry into the Human Mind, on the Principles of Common Sense Reid, mInquiry Reid Thomas Bell & Bradfute Edinburgh and London 1801 cit pp46-47 .

These lines form a vertical list in the right gutter of the page; this list seems to function as a “mood chart,” describing MME’s temperament between 22 March and 11 April 1821. No Tolman transcription is extant for this text.

MME is quoting and paraphrasing an 1821 review of Dugald Stewart’s Outlines of Moral Philosophy, for the use of students in the University of Edinburgh (1818), from the Christian Spectator: “And in the first place, ‘too much stress’ he says ‘has been laid on the argument derived from the nature of mind.’ The proper use of the doctrine of the soul’s Immateriality, he says, is ‘not to demonstrate that the soul is physically and necessarily immortal; but to refute the objections which have been urged against the possibility of its existing in a separate state from the body.’ In short, he does not think our knowledge of the nature of mind is sufficient to afford us any positive argument on the subject; for we know nothing of the nature of mind except that, since its qualities are essentially different from the qualities of matter, the nature of the one is probably different from the nature of the other; and consequently the dissolution of the body does not necessarily imply the extinction of the soul, but the ‘presumption is in favour of the contrary supposition.’ So confident is he however, that the nature of mind and body are essentially different, that he considers even the Ideal theory of Berkeley as ‘more philosophical than the doctrine of materialism,’ in as much as the former ‘only contradicts the suggestion of our perceptions, while the latter contradicts the suggestions of our consciousness.’ The latter part of this article is too good to be passed over without presenting to our readers almost the whole of it. ‘There are various circumstances which render it highly probable, that the union between soul and body, which takes place in our present state, so far from being essential to the exercise of our powers and faculties, was intended to limit the sphere of our information; and to prevent us from acquiring in this early stage of our being, too clear a view of the constitution and government of the universe. Indeed when we reflect on the difference between the operations of mind and the qualities of matter, it appears much more wonderful, that the two substances should be so intimately united, as we find them actually to be, than to suppose that the former may exist in a conscious and intelligent state when separated from the latter’” NA_Review_of_New_Publications103 Review of New Publications Christian Spectator aNew Publications page244-57 May 1821 vol3 issue5 pp244257244–57 cit pp246 .

This page is inscribed in “patchwork” fashion, with triangular-shaped blanks in the middle of the text.

MME is paraphrasing Germaine De Staël: “The ancients were better skilled in morals than in philosophy: an accurate study of the sciences is necessary to rectify metaphysics: but nature has placed in the heart of man a guide to conduct him to virtue: nevertheless, nothing could be more unsettled and unconnected than the moral code of the ancients … Rank and morals were confounded by many of the Greek philosophers: the love of study, and the performance of the first duties, were classed together. In their enthusiasm for the faculties of the mind, they allowed them a place of esteem beyond every thing else: they excited men to the acquirement of admiration; but they never looked with an eye of penetration into the heart” De_Staël_Influence27 Influence of Literature Upon Society De Staël, mInfluence De Staël-Holstein Anne Louise Germaine W. Wells and T. B. Wait Boston 1813 2 vols. cit pp1:121 .

MME is quoting from Charles Robert Maturin’s gothic novel Melmoth the Wanderer: “Is the fire caught from heaven to be employed in lighting a faggot to keep the cold from the numbed and wasted fingers of poverty” Maturin_Melmoth62 Melmoth the Wanderer: A Tale Maturin, mMelmoth Maturin Charles Robert Archibald Constable Edinburgh 1820 4 vols. cit pp4:115 .

We have not been able to ascertain MME’s source for Plato’s Republic in this particular Almanack, but because she extracts several excerpts from Gillies’s translation of Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics on its front and back covers, she may allude to his extensive discussion of the Republic and women’s role within it. Gillies objects to Plato’s premise that guardian women and children be shared by guardian men, believing that men are the injured party in this relation Gillies_Aristotles_Ethics42 Aristotle’sEthics and Politics, Comprising his Practical Philosophy, Translated from the Greek. . . Gillies, mAristotle's Ethics Aristotle translator Gillies John T. Cadell and W. Davies London 1813 2 vols. cit pp2:85-86, 98-94, 98 .

MME is quoting from John Gillies’s translation of Aristotle: “With Aristotle, all will is free-will; since nothing can be more free than that which is voluntary” Gillies_Aristotles_Ethics42 Aristotle’sEthics and Politics, Comprising his Practical Philosophy, Translated from the Greek. . . Gillies, mAristotle's Ethics Aristotle translator Gillies John T. Cadell and W. Davies London 1813 2 vols. cit pp1:289 .

MME is commonplacing from Friedrich von Schlegel’s Lectures on the History of Literature, as indicated by other passages in this Almanack: “After the time of Charlemagne, the multiplying of manuscripts was a work pursued with the most zealous and systematical application”; and “The Greek language was certainly not unknown in Germany, at least between the time of Charlemagne, who learned Greek himself in his old age” Schlegel_Lectures127 Lectures on the History of Literature, Ancient and Modern Schlegel, mLectures Schlegel Friedrich von translator Lockhart John Gibson Thomas Dobson and Son Philadelphia 1818 2 vols. cit pp1:282,285 .

MME commonplaces from Friedrich von Schlegel’s Lectures on the History of Literature: “Besides, in the countries whose present languages are of Roman origin, the Latin, in those days, was scarcely considered as a foreign or even as a dead language, but rather as the old and genuine language of the land, preserved in its regularity and purity by the men of learning and education, in opposition to the corrupt and vague dialects of the common people—the vulgar tongues, as they were called. In those countries the Latin language ceased not to be a living one till the 9th or 10th century. . . . But it is evident that the delusion under which men lay in considering the Latin language as still alive, many centuries after it was really extinct, was very much prolonged by the perpetual use of that language in all the observances of religion, and in all the societies of the cloisters. It sustained daily altercations, but was never altogether laid aside” Schlegel_Lectures127 Lectures on the History of Literature, Ancient and Modern Schlegel, mLectures Schlegel Friedrich von translator Lockhart John Gibson Thomas Dobson and Son Philadelphia 1818 2 vols. cit pp1:278-9 .

MME is paraphrasing Germaine De Staël: “Socrates and Plato preferred speaking to writing; because they felt, without exactly rendering to themselves an account of their talents, that their ideas belonged more to imitation than to analysis. They loved to have recourse to that impulse and elevation of thought which is produced by the animated language of conversation; and they searched with as much diligence for something to inflame the imagination, as the metaphysicians and moralists of our days would employ, to secure their works from the smallest appearance of poetic.” For deriving their inspiration from poetry, De Staël praises Alexander Pope, John Milton, Thomas Gray, Oliver Goldsmith, John Dryden, Edward Young, William Shakespeare, Henry Fielding, and Samuel Richardson De_Staël_Influence27 Influence of Literature Upon Society De Staël, mInfluence De Staël-Holstein Anne Louise Germaine W. Wells and T. B. Wait Boston 1813 2 vols. cit pp1: 143, 318-327 .

MME is quoting Adam Smith’s Theory of Moral Sentiments: “As in the common degree of the intellectual qualities, there are no abilities; so in the common degree of the moral, there is no virtue” Smith_Theory131 Theory of Moral Sentiments. . . Smith, mTheory Smith Adam Wells and Lilly Boston 1817 2 vols. cit pp1:25 .

MME is quoting Dugald Stewart’s Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind: “The chief difference between the opinions of Plato and Aristotle on the subject of ideas, related to the mode of their existence. That the matter of which all things are made, existed from eternity, was a principle that both admitted; but Plato farther taught, that, of every species of things, there is an idea of form which also existed from eternity, and that this idea is the exemplar or model according to which the individuals of the species were made; whereas Aristotle held, that, although matter may exist without form, yet that forms could not exist without matter” Stewart_Elements135 Elements of the Philosophy of the Human Mind Stewart, mElements Stewart Dugald Wells and Lilly Boston 1821 2 vols. bound in one cit pp1:93 . MME also quotes from William Wordsworth’s poem “The Wanderer” in The Excursion: Being a Portion of the Recluse, a Poem: “But we have known that there is often found / In mournful thoughts, and always might be found, / A power to virtue friendly” Wordsworth_Wanderer153 The Wanderer Wordsworth William The Excursion, Being a Portion of the Recluse, a Poem Wordsworth, aWanderer page3-49 Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown London 1814 pp3493–49 cit pp34 .