Patches — encoding


  
    to be of a greater height, measured from their base, than any others in our country and
    perhaps in North America. from data which may found a tolerable conjecture, we suppose
  
  
    the highest peak to be betweenabout four or five thousand feet perpendicular height. which
    is but aboutnot a fifth part of the height or one third of the height of the mountains in North America nor one third of the height which would be necessary in our latitude to preserve ice in the open air unmelted through the year. the ridge
  
  
    
      the highest peak to be about 1000 feet perpendicular, which is not a fifth part of the height of the mountains of
      South America, nor one third of the height which would be necessary in our
      latitude to preserve ice in the open area unmelted through the year. The ridge of mountains
    
  
  
    of mountains next beyond the Blueridge, called by us the North mountain is of the greatest ex-
    -tent; for which reason they were named by the Indians the Endless mountains.
    A substance supposed to be Pumice, found floating on the Missisipi has induced      
  
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Patches are encoded with a surface since they occur on a separate page from the rest of the text. In this example, the encoder has simply used the xml:id on surface and on the zone that that is covered by the patch to describe the function of the patch itself.

The encoder can use the type attribute on surface to show when a particular surface is a pastedown. The TEI does not define the values on type for surface, so this is not required, but it may be useful for you to distinguish between pastedown surfaces and other surfaces in the text. There is also an attachment attribute (not shown here) that allows you to state how that particular surface is attached to the main surface (values could be "glued," "pinned," or "sewn," according to the TEI Guidelines.

Note that this encoder does not assert anything about whether the patch is meant to substitute the zone that is covered or supplement it. You can use your judgment about how you want to encode patches, based on the editorial practices of your project.

Advanced Manuscript Encoding, slide 16 of 23