Teaching Tags and Metadata in Women Writers in Review

Teaching Tags and Metadata in Women Writers in Review

By Jason M. Payton, Sam Houston State University Note: Jason M. Payton is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. PROJECT OVERVIEW My course is a junior-level survey of American literature to 1865, and my students are primarily English majors and minors (course syllabus here). Most of my students have never had a class in women’s and gender studies, so I wanted to use the survey course as an opportunity to engage students with some of the critical issues raised in these…

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The WWP Begins Research into Word Vector Analysis

The WWP Begins Research into Word Vector Analysis

We are thrilled to announce that the Women Writers Project has begun work on a new project “Word Vector Analysis for TEI/XML: A user-Friendly Toolkit,” funded under a Tier 1 grant from Northeastern University, awarded to project co-PIs, professors Julia Flanders, Elizabeth Dillon, and Cody Dunne. “Word Vector Analysis for TEI/XML” brings together two major digital humanities methodologies: text encoding and text analysis, as we aim to develop an exploratory web interface as part of the WWO Lab, which will…

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Rhetorical Intertextualities of M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse

Rhetorical Intertextualities of M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Dr. Elizabeth Ann Mackay, University of Dayton My project for the Women Writers Project explores an oft-cited, but rarely studied, mother’s advice book: M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse (1631). Compared to other seventeenth-century mother’s advice books, blessings, and legacies, such as Dorothy Leigh’s The Mothers Blessing, Elizabeth Clinton’s The Countesse of Lincolnes Nurserie, and Elizabeth Joceline’s The…

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Food History and Auto-Intertextuality in Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley

Food History and Auto-Intertextuality in Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Dr. Cassie Childs, University of South Florida My project for Intertextual Networks involves creating a digital exhibit that examines the intertextuality between Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley (1696), food history, archival manuscripts, and Manley’s later writing, both fiction and non-fiction. The project will develop in two stages: the first phase will engage with material history by annotating the primary text…

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“Day of DH” Snapshots of Our Daily Lives

“Day of DH” Snapshots of Our Daily Lives

The Women Writers Project is proud to host our local Digital Scholarship Group “Day of DH” post this year. “Day of DH” provides an opportunity for members of the DH community to share “day in the life” vignettes with each other. For more information about “Day of DH,” please view the official site and you can follow the twitter hashtag #DayofDH.  I hope these snapshots offer a fun array of some of the people, activities, and work that comprises the DH community at Northeastern. Julia Flanders, Director…

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Cavendish X Molière: Braiding The Politics of Inter-Gender Dialogue

Cavendish X Molière: Braiding The Politics of Inter-Gender Dialogue

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Arnaud Zimmern, Ph.D. Candidate in English, University of Notre Dame Were it but for matters of language—that Margaret Cavendish’s French was, like Molière’s English, non-existent—the titular resonance between her 1662 The Female Academy and his 1662 L’Ecole des femmes would defy coincidence. Similarly, the ambitions for all-female education and for celibate female autonomy at stake in her 1668 The Convent…

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Intertextual connections in An Collins’s Divine Songs and Meditacions: poetry versus prose

Intertextual connections in An Collins’s Divine Songs and Meditacions: poetry versus prose

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Jenna Townend, Ph.D. Candidate in English, Drama, and Publishing, Loughborough University My collaborative work with the Intertextual Networks project takes the form of an investigation into how quantitative network analysis can help us map intertextual practices and influences in the poetry of the seventeenth-century writer, An Collins. Her collection of devotional poems, Divine Songs and Meditacions (1653), is the only…

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Making (and using!) WWO:SDI

Making (and using!) WWO:SDI

Recently, we published an announcement about the release of the Women Writers Online: Scrabble Discovery Interface (WWO:SDI), which was (we hope) fairly obviously an April Fools’ Day joke. For all its silliness, however, WWO:SDI demonstrates some of the much more practical tools we have for interacting with WWO. More than that, the WWO:SDI interface itself has proved to be a remarkably effective proofing tool. This second point may be less surprising when you note that WWO:SDI is similar to some…

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Announcing the Women Writers Online: Scrabble Discovery Tool!

Announcing the Women Writers Online: Scrabble Discovery Tool!

The WWP is delighted to report that we have developed a new interface that will enhance the texts in Women Writers Online by allowing users to discover the Scrabble® scores for the words in each text. The Women Writers Online: Scrabble Discovery Interface (WWO:SDI) provides sortable lists for all WWO texts, making it possible for users to determine the highest- and lowest-scoring words in the collection. The chart also denotes words that cannot be played in a single turn because…

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Women Writers and Print Networks in Eighteenth-Century England

Women Writers and Print Networks in Eighteenth-Century England

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Kate Ozment, Texas A&M University My project for the Intertextual Networks traces the material links between women writers in the long eighteenth century in England—their publishers. We have long discussed how significant numbers of women made their way into the literary side of the print market after the Restoration of Charles II. We have also begun to outline with more certainly…

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