Intertextual Networks: Theorizing and Encoding Textual Connections in Early Women’s Writing

Intertextual Networks: Theorizing and Encoding Textual Connections in Early Women’s Writing

Below are lecture notes from a paper by Sarah Connell and Julia Flanders, part of a panel on intertextuality in early women’s texts at DH2017.  I want to begin by thanking our co-panelists for their really thoughtful and exciting presentations, as well as my co-author Julia Flanders, the conference organizers, and, of course, all of you for joining us today. I also have to thank the NEH for their support of this project as well as the rest of the…

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Word Embedding Models Are the New Topic Models

Word Embedding Models Are the New Topic Models

By Jonathan Fitzgerald, Ph.D. Candidate in English, Northeastern University I remember the first time I trained a topic model. It was in a course called Humanities Data Analysis, taught by Ben Schmidt. He provided us a corpus of the Federalist Papers and some code that he adapted from David Mimno, contributor to the original MALLET package and author of the R implementation of MALLET. After the initial confusion–“topics” aren’t topics in the traditional sense, after all–it felt like magic. The computer…

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Intertextuality in Mary Astell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies (1694) and in Reflections upon Marriage (1706)

Intertextuality in Mary Astell’s A Serious Proposal to the Ladies (1694) and in Reflections upon Marriage (1706)

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Ioanna Kyvernitou, National University of Ireland, Galway  For Intertextual Networks, I am evaluating the markup in two works of Mary Astell (1666–1731) as found in Women Writers Online–A Serious Proposal to the Ladies, for the Advancement of Their True and Greatest Interest (1694) and the third edition of Reflections upon Marriage (1706)–in order to consider practices for encoding intertextuality. Astell, a philosopher and theologian who…

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“‘The Text is Variety’: Contextualizing and Analyzing the Works of Margaret Cavendish with Text Encoding

“‘The Text is Variety’: Contextualizing and Analyzing the Works of Margaret Cavendish with Text Encoding

Below are lecture notes from Sarah Connell’s presentation at the 2017 International Margaret Cavendish Society Conference. The slides are available as a separate file here. Okay, so, since one of the themes of this conference is how Cavendish was received, I want to begin with a quote about her from a text in Women Writers Online. So, here we have Elizabeth Benger on Cavendish, speaking of her fertile fancy, her uncommon genius, her wildness and inaccuracy, and her voluminous works. And,…

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Announcing New Publications to Women Writers Online and Women Writers in Context

Announcing New Publications to Women Writers Online and Women Writers in Context

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added six new texts to Women Writers Online. These are: Hester Chapone’s 1777 A Letter to a New-Married Lady, Emily Clark’s 1819 The Esquimaux (vol. 3), Anne Conway’s 1692 Principles of the Most Ancient and Modern Philosophy, Caroline Cushing’s 1832 Letters, Descriptive of Public Monuments, Scenery, and Manners in France and Spain (vol. 2), Sarah Osborn and Susanna Anthony’s 1807 Familiar Letters, and Mary Pix’s 1699 The False Friend. In addition to spanning three centuries, these texts highlight the diversity…

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The Queen’s Two Corpora: Finding Elizabeth and Creating Corpora using the WWO Database

The Queen’s Two Corpora: Finding Elizabeth and Creating Corpora using the WWO Database

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Kristen Abbott Bennett, Stonehill College At Tilbury, Elizabeth I gave a rousing speech to motivate her subjects, exclaiming: “I know I have the bodie, but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and Stomach of a King, and of a King of England” (Cabala). Elizabeth’s recognition of her female princely bodies as simultaneously separate and the same reflects…

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Teaching with Women Writers in Review

Teaching with Women Writers in Review

By Jason M. Payton, Sam Houston State University Note: Jason M. Payton is a pedagogical development consultant for the WWP. PROJECT OVERVIEW My course is a junior-level survey of American literature to 1865, and my students are primarily English majors and minors (course syllabus here). Most of my students have never had a class in women’s and gender studies, so I wanted to use the survey course as an opportunity to engage students with some of the critical issues raised in these…

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The WWP Begins Research into Word Vector Analysis

The WWP Begins Research into Word Vector Analysis

We are thrilled to announce that the Women Writers Project has begun work on a new project “Word Vector Analysis for TEI/XML: A user-Friendly Toolkit,” funded under a Tier 1 grant from Northeastern University, awarded to project co-PIs, professors Julia Flanders, Elizabeth Dillon, and Cody Dunne. “Word Vector Analysis for TEI/XML” brings together two major digital humanities methodologies: text encoding and text analysis, as we aim to develop an exploratory web interface as part of the WWO Lab, which will…

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Rhetorical Intertextualities of M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse

Rhetorical Intertextualities of M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Dr. Elizabeth Ann Mackay, University of Dayton My project for the Women Writers Project explores an oft-cited, but rarely studied, mother’s advice book: M. R.’s The Mothers Counsell, or Live Within Compasse (1631). Compared to other seventeenth-century mother’s advice books, blessings, and legacies, such as Dorothy Leigh’s The Mothers Blessing, Elizabeth Clinton’s The Countesse of Lincolnes Nurserie, and Elizabeth Joceline’s The…

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Food History and Auto-Intertextuality in Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley

Food History and Auto-Intertextuality in Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley

This post is part of a series authored by our collaborators on the Intertextual Networks project. For more information, see here.  By Dr. Cassie Childs, University of South Florida My project for Intertextual Networks involves creating a digital exhibit that examines the intertextuality between Delarivier Manley’s Letters Written by Mrs Manley (1696), food history, archival manuscripts, and Manley’s later writing, both fiction and non-fiction. The project will develop in two stages: the first phase will engage with material history by annotating the primary text…

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