History of Grants

During its history the WWP has received a number of grants from federal agencies and private foundations. Below is a list of these grants and their aims, and (where available) links to grant reports.

The National Endowment for the Humanities

2012-2014 This three-year grant supports a series of advanced institutes on topics in scholarly text encoding.
Funding received: $250,000

2011-2014 This grant, co-sponsored by the DFG, supported an international workshop on data modeling in digital humanities. Records of the event are available here and here.
Funding received: $38,000

2011-2014 This three-year grant supports a collaborative research project on the reception history of women’s writing.
Funding received: $200,000

2009-2011 This two-year grant supported a set of six seminars on advanced topics in scholarly text encoding. final report is available.
Funding received: $196,000

2008-2009 This one and a half-year grant supported a pilot project to explore the encoding of personal names and personal information on a subset of the WWO collection. A final report and white paper are available.
Funding received: $49,992

2007-2009 This two and a half-year grant supported a two-year series of eleven seminars in scholarly text encoding. A final report is available.
Funding received: $250,005

2003-2006 This three-year grant supported the publication of an encoding guide for scholarly text encoding using the TEI Guidelines, based on the WWP’s encoding documentation. A final report is available.
Funding received: $206,375

1999-2000 This brief extension to the previous grant provided bridge funding for the period before the publication of Women Writers Online.
Funding received: $33,037

1997-1999 This grant supported extensive additions to the textbase, including a wide range of 18th-century materials. In 1999, the textbase was published electronically as Women Writers Online. A final report is available.
Funding received: $190,000 outright and $50,000 in matching funds

1995-1997 This grant period saw resumed transcription, with emphasis on Renaissance texts, and also the beginnings of our research into electronic publication. We also developed comprehensive documentation systems to track workflow and document methodology more systematically.
Funding received: $190,000 outright and $50,000 in matching funds

1993-1995 During the period covered by this grant, we began extensive research on the newly published TEI Guidelines to determine how to apply this encoding system to early women’s writing. Very few texts were transcribed during this period.
Funding received: $148,713 outright and $35,000 in matching funds

1991-1993 Further transcription, and initial research on TEI/SGML encoding; this grant also enabled us to experiment with various forms of output, including traditional printed books.
Funding received: $100,000

1988-1991 Our first grant from NEH, which funded the initial research and development of the collection; during this grant period we performed the initial transcription of substantial numbers of texts, and created several anthologies for classroom use.
Funding received: $100,000 outright and $100,000 in matching funds

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation

1997-1999 This three-year grant funded the development of Renaissance Women Online, a subset of Women Writers Online which includes 100 Renaissance texts, together with biographical and contextual materials. The goal of the grant was to study and compare the use of digital and print materials in research and teaching, and in addition to the online collection it also funded a survey of faculty attitudes, beliefs, and practices with digital tools. An interim and final report are available.
Funding received: $400,000

The Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation

2003-2004 This one-year grant funded the initial phase of work on the publication of the WWP’s encoding documentation.
Funding received: $25,000