Announcements

March 1, 2017

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March. We invite you to explore and enjoy the 392 texts in the collection!

If you haven’t visited Women Writers Online before, there are many different ways to find new texts. For instance, you can try filtering by genre or by publication year. The keyword search box is another good way to begin exploring. Or, you might want to go to our open-access collections Women Writers in Review and Women Writers in Context and browse the themes and topics there for subjects you’re interested in, since both collections link back to the texts in WWO. If you have worked with WWO in the past, you might want to see our recently published texts here. Finally, we have a short blog post with some good places to get started in the WWO collection.

December 30, 2016

New Publications to Women Writers Online and Women Writers in Context

The WWP is delighted to report that we have added four new texts to Women Writers Online. These are: Aphra Behn’s 1689 The History of the Nun, Emily Clark’s 1819 The Esquimaux (vol. 2), Frances Sheridan’s 1791 Eugenia and Adelaide (vol. 2), and Lydia Howard Sigourney’s 1824 Sketch of Connecticut, Forty Years Since. These texts span three centuries in the WWO collection—and their geographic scope is equally wide, representing settings in Spain, Belgium, Scotland, and New England, among many others. For more information on these texts, and the WWP’s other recent publications, please see this list of new additions to WWO.

We have also published a new folder from the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson, created in partnership with the editors of The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition. Dated c. 23 July 1812–November 1813, this long folder reflects Emerson’s reading of John Foxe’s Lives of the Martyrs and Edward Taylor’s Rule and Exercises of Holy Living; the folder also includes Emerson’s discussions of the writings of moral philosopher Joseph Butler and a new biography of Martin Luther, whom Emerson reveres for his courage and faith. As the editors’ introduction to this folder explains, “Emerson’s attention at this turbulent political time is drawn to multiple scenes—from the local, where she notes the public execution of two criminals in Boston; to the national, as the continued war of 1812 raises fears for a potential military invasion of the city and many residents prepare to flee; to the global, as she laments Napoleon’s recent invasion of Russia.”

Accompanying the publication of these early texts by women, we have added three new exhibits to Women Writers in Context, an experimental publication series designed to engage readers in exploration and discovery of topics related to early women’s writing. The first of these, “Mary Moody Emerson as Reader and Reviewer,” discusses Emerson’s “extensive, experimental, and eclectic” reading and writing practices, showing that the “wealth of her literary and philosophical milieu, her engagement with the public intellectual marketplace, and her generic experiments represent a significant example of textual reception and circulation in antebellum America.” The second, “Maria Edgeworth in Review,” introduces several key topics from early transatlantic literary culture—textual constructions of national identities, gender and authorship, publication and review practices, and the development of the novel—as they are evident in periodical responses to Edgeworth’s works in the recently-published collection, Women Writers in Review. The third, “Women, Mathematics, and the Periodical Tradition in Britain: or a History of Women Rocking Math from the Beginning,” is the first in a new series of exhibits considering early women writers and mathematics, edited by Jacqueline Wernimont. These exhibits were created as part of the NEH-funded Cultures of Reception research initiative, which studied the reception and readership of early women’s writing.

We hope that these new publications will complement each other, inviting readers to explore works by women in various contexts and from multiple angles and perspectives.

December 14, 2016

Call for Pedagogical Partners

The WWP is now inviting expressions of interest from teaching consultants who would work with us to create assignments that use our recently-published collection, Women Writers in Review. Collaborators would have our support in developing assignments and activities and would be named as pedagogical development consultants for the WWP. We are also inviting responses from those who would like to develop—or who already have!—assignments and activities involving Women Writers Online for publication on our site. If you don’t have institutional access to WWO and would like to set up a trial (for either yourself or your institution), please contact us. More details on WWO licensing and trials can be found here.

If you’re interested in getting involved, please email wwp@neu.edu with a brief expression of interest by January 15, 2017—just a short paragraph on the teaching you’ll be doing in spring 2017 or fall 2017 and some initial thoughts on how you’d like to use the WWiR or WWO collections. For full details about the WWP’s pedagogical partnership program, please see here.

November 30, 2016

Registration is Now Open for Three WWP Workshops

Registration is open for three upcoming TEI seminars offered by the Women Writers Project and the Digital Scholarship Group at the Northeastern University Library. The first workshop, Introduction to XSLT, will be held January 12 and 19, 1–4pm, and January 13, 10am–1pm. The second workshop, Introduction to TEI, will be held on February 17th–18th. The third workshop, Introduction to TEI Customization, will be held on April 7th–8th. Northeastern University will host all of the seminars. Registration for Introduction to XSLT is $150. Registration for Introduction to TEI and TEI Customization is $450 (students and TEI members, $300) each. Registration to all workshops is free for members of the Northeastern University community. For more information and to register, please visit our workshops and seminars page.

Introduction to XSLT will offer digital humanists familiar with XML languages—TEI, EAD, XHTML, and others—training to transform, manipulate, and publish your data in extraordinarily flexible ways. This seminar will introduce participants to the essential concepts of XSLT in a digital humanities context, dealing with real-world textual data and the complex encoding languages we work with. Working from templates, participants will develop stylesheets that explore the basic capacities of XSLT, and will learn how to read and reverse engineer other people's stylesheets to develop their skills. Register here by January 9, 2017.

Introduction to TEI offers an intensive exploration of scholarly text encoding, aimed at an audience of humanities scholars, archivists, and digital humanists. Through a combination of hands-on practice, presentation, and discussion, participants will work through the essentials of TEI markup and consider how markup languages make meaning and support scholarship in the digital age. No prior experience is necessary. The schedule for the workshop is here. Register here by February 10, 2017.

The TEI Customization seminar will introduce participants to the central concepts of TEI customization and to the language (a variant of the TEI itself) in which TEI customizations are written. Good customizations capture the project’s specific modeling decisions, and ensure consistency in the data, while retaining as much interoperability and mutual intelligibility with other TEI projects and tools as possible. The schedule for the workshop is here. Register here by April 1, 2017.

November 16, 2016

The WWP Announces New Publication: Women Writers in Review

We are delighted to announce the publication of Women Writers in Review, a collection of more than 600 eighteenth- and nineteenth-century reviews, publication notices, literary histories, and other texts responding to works by early women writers, transcribed and encoded in the Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) markup language. The Women Writers in Review interface offers sorting by the reviews’ sources, by the authors and works that they reference, by their genres and formats, and by tracked tags such as the topics they discuss and their evaluations of reviewed texts. We have also published an API, so that researchers can query and access the Women Writers in Review data and resources in JSON or HTML.

Women Writers in Review was created as part of the Cultures of Reception project, which was designed to investigate the discourse of reception in connection with the changing transatlantic literary landscape from 1770 to 1830. The Cultures of Reception project was generously funded by a Collaborative Research grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

We hope that Women Writers in Review will enable researchers to address a wide range of questions, which might include: how do periodical reviews in this period imagine the relationship between the local and transnational writing spaces? How do reviews work to constitute for women authors a sense of a reading public? What are the differences that mark reading and reviewing practices across various regions and localities? To what extent does geography affect patterns of reference to women’s writing during this period? How do reviews, anthologies, and other similar sources gender particular spaces or locations of reading? And, we hope, many others!

We are also looking for faculty or graduate students who are interested in using Women Writers in Review in their classrooms to develop sample assignments using the collection. If you would like to learn more about becoming a pedagogical development consultant for the Women Writers Project, please contact us at wwp@neu.edu.

To begin exploring the collection, please visit the main page or read this explanation of the site’s features.

September 23, 2016

The WWP Adds Nine New Exhibits to Women Writers in Context

We are pleased to report that we have added nine new exhibits to Women Writers in Context, an experimental publication series designed to engage readers in exploration and discovery of topics related to early women’s writing. Exhibits are brief essays that combine critical arguments, images and media objects, visualizations, and links to the primary sources in Women Writers Online.

The newly released exhibits, written by scholars of literary and historical studies, offer introductions to works by Margaret Roper, Anne Bradstreet, Hannah Wolley, Eleanor Davies, Katharine Evans, Sarah Chevers, Rachel Speght, Elizabeth Melville, Eliza Haywood, and Elizabeth Clinton. May of these exhibits discuss women’s responses to questions of religion and education and thus provide context to the religious and instructional texts that we have recently published in Women Writers Online.

The Women Writers in Context platform is designed to serve as a point of entry for the materials in Women Writers Online, highlighting connections among the texts and their authors. Exhibits have several reading and display options, with contextual details for the persons and texts discussed, a timeline view showing significant events, and links to additional readings and information.

Explore these exhibits and others here. See more on the content and goals of Women Writers in Context here. Interested in contributing an exhibit? A guide for authors is available here.

August 9, 2016

The WWP Receives Funding for Intertextual Networks Project

The WWP is delighted to report that we have received funding for a three-year, $290,000, project from the National Endowment for the Humanities, focusing on intertextuality in early women’s writing. Starting in October 2016, the WWP will begin work on Intertextual Networks, a collaborative research initiative that will examine the citation and quotation practices of the authors represented in Women Writers Online (WWO) to explore and theorize the representation of intertextuality.

For this project, the WWP will assemble a collaborative research team that includes faculty, graduate students, and members of the WWP staff, representing a diverse set of perspectives and expertise. Each member of the collaborative group will pursue a research project engaging with materials from WWO, to be published in Women Writers in Context, the WWP’s open-access publication series. We will also be developing interface tools for exploring intertextual connections and patterns. As part of this work, we will be undertaking a broad encoding of quotations and citations across the entire WWO collection, linking textual references to a comprehensive bibliography of sources, which we will make openly available at the WWO Lab. We will also make a deeper exploration of subtler kinds of intertextual reference (such as allusion and parody) in a subset of the collection, to reveal the many ways in which the textual space reverberates with echoes and referential gestures. This deeper exploration will be strongly informed by the research of our scholarly collaborators and the particular projects they undertake.

We have recruited an initial set of collaborators and we are currently soliciting proposals for additional scholars interested in joining the project. For more details and to submit a proposal, see here. For updates on our progress and discoveries, as well as the work being done by our collaborators, see the WWP’s blog.

Intertextual Networks has been made possible in part by a major grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. Any views, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this project, do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

July 7, 2016

The WWP Adds Seven New Texts and Two New Folders to Women Writers Online

The WWP has added seven new texts to Women Writers Online, including several works of biblical exegesis by the seventeenth-century prophet Lady Eleanor Davies as well as later works in both poetry and prose. This publication set features texts that highlight the international scope of women’s writing, such as Maria Gowen Brooks’s 1834 poem Zóphiël, which was written in locations that include Cuba, France, and New Hampshire, and which was “published for the benefit of the Polish Exiles.” The newly published texts also include Emily Clark’s 1819 novel, The Esquimaux, which ranges from Newfoundland to Devonshire, and Frances Sheridan’s 1791 Eugenia and Adelaide, whose title characters are two young women, “both natives of Salerno, in the kingdom of Naples.”

We are also very pleased to be publishing two new folders from the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson, created in partnership with the editors of The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition. The folders are dated to c. 1822 and 1826 and they include Emerson’s meditations on the immortality of the soul, as well as what the editors call a “rare commentary on gender roles,” in her statement that a woman who attracts admiration and celebrity is “a kind of moral comet who has apparently passed the limits of nature and order.”

To see a list of the texts recently added to Women Writers Online, visit our new titles page. Or visit our full title list for a complete list of all the titles currently included in WWO.

April 8, 2016

The WWP Launches New Blog

We’re happy to welcome readers to the Women Writers Project’s blog, which will be a space where we can share work in progress, reveal interesting details about specific texts and encoding problems, and explore ideas for new features in Women Writers Online. Read more about our plans and view the first post here.

March 1, 2016

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March. We invite you to explore and enjoy the 380 texts in the collection!

January 22, 2016

Registration is Open for XSLT Workshop in March

Registration is open for the upcoming XSLT workshop offered by the Women Writers Project and the Digital Scholarship Group at the Northeastern University Library. The workshop will be held at Northeastern University, March 17–18, 2016. The cost is $450 ($300 for TEI members and students) and the registration deadline is March 11, but the workshop may fill before then. For more information and to register, please visit our workshops and seminars page.

XSLT is a crucial tool for those working with the TEI, both as a key part of any XML publication system and also as a technology for manipulating and managing XML data. As a programming language that can be used to transform XML data into other formats, it is immensely powerful and also comparatively approachable for those already familiar with XML. This seminar will provide participants with an understanding of the essential concepts of XSLT, focusing on examples and use cases from TEI data in the humanities. Familiarity with TEI and XML is assumed but no prior experience with XSLT is necessary.

We hope to see you there!

December 30, 2015

The WWP Adds Six New Texts to Women Writers Online

Just in time for the new year, the WWP has added six new text to Women Writers Online. This winter publication complements the texts we published in the fall, highlighting the considerable variety in women’s engagements with religious concerns and international affairs. In addition to several prophetic works by Eleanor Davies, these texts include novels that comment on war, politics, and religion in eighteenth-century France—Charlotte Smith’s Desmond (1792) and Eliza Haywood’s Love in Excess (1719)—and texts that participate in contemporary debates over slavery, including the 1832 Memoir of Mrs. Chloe Spear, written by a “Lady of Boston,” and Helen Maria Williams’s A Poem on the Bill Lately Passed for Regulating the Slave Trade (1788).

To see a list of the texts recently added to Women Writers Online, visit our new titles page. Or visit our full title list for a complete list of all the titles currently included in WWO.

December 3, 2015

The WWP Adds Several New Exhibits to Women Writers in Context

The WWP is pleased to announce that we have added several new exhibits to Women Writers in Context, an experimental publication series designed to engage readers in exploration and discovery of topics related to early women’s writing. Exhibits are brief essays that combine critical arguments, images and media objects, visualizations, and links to the primary sources in Women Writers Online.

The Women Writers in Context platform is designed to serve as a point of entry for the materials in Women Writers Online, highlighting connections among the texts and their authors. Exhibits have several reading and display options, with contextual details for the persons and texts discussed, a timeline view showing significant events, and links to additional readings and information.

The newly released exhibits, written by scholars of literary and historical studies, offer introductions to works by Margaret Cavendish, Eliza Haywood, Mary Sidney, Mary Waite, Dorothy Burch, Anne Bradstreet, and Dorothy Leigh. These exhibits invite consideration of the ways that women engaged with topics such as education, politics, science, and religion—they also discuss women’s interventions into literary concerns, including translation, authorship, and genre.

Explore these exhibits and others here. See more on the content and goals of Women Writers in Context here. Interested in contributing an exhibit? A guide for authors is available here.

October 14, 2015

The WWP Releases MARC Records for the Texts in Women Writers Online

The WWP is delighted to announce the publication of freely-downloadable metadata records for all of the texts in Women Writers Online, available here in both MARC and MARCXML formats.

As we continue to add texts to Women Writers Online, we will publish metadata sets consisting of records created or changed since the last publication. At that time, we will also update the set containing records for all published WWO texts.

September 27, 2015

The WWP Adds Six New Texts to Women Writers Online

To celebrate the start of a new academic year, the WWP has added six new texts to Women Writers Online. These represent several genres of women’s writing: novels by Charlotte Smith and Charlotte Lennox; poetry by Helen Maria Williams and Janet Little; and two religious texts by the seventeenth-century prophet Eleanor Davies.

To see a list of the texts recently added to Women Writers Online, visit our new titles page. To see a listing of all the texts in Women Writers Online, visit our full title list. MARC records for the texts in WWO are available here.

May 18, 2015

The WWP Adds Seventeen New Texts to Women Writers Online

The WWP is pleased to announce the publication of seventeen new texts to Women Writers Online. The spring publication contains texts that explore the topics of education and instruction from a variety of angles, including advice to parents, fables and histories for children, and instructional poetry. We are experimenting with this thematic approach to publication as a way to make the texts in WWO more accessible to students, teachers, and researchers while highlighting the range of ways that women engaged with contemporary issues. Highlights include Melesina Trench’s Thoughts of a Parent on Education (1837), Priscilla Wakefield’s Mental Improvement (1794), Sarah Trimmer’s Fabulous Histories (1786), and Maria Edgeworth’s The Little Dog Trusty; the Orange Man; and the Cherry Orchard (1801). Our spring publication also includes a group of brief texts by the seventeenth-century prophet Eleanor Davies, several of which intersect with the topic of education by offering religious instruction.

We are also very excited to be publishing four new folders from the Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson, created in partnership with the editors of The Almanacks of Mary Moody Emerson: A Scholarly Digital Edition. This collaboration provides an opportunity for the WWP to pilot the publication of manuscript texts and to think through questions of document materiality and digital scholarly editing. The Almanack folders newly added to WWO are dated 1811, 1813, and 1814. They explore such topics as conditions in Boston during the War of 1812; comparative religions and monuments dedicated to science, the arts, and religion; and Emerson’s fervent belief that "every christian pen," regardless of one’s position in the church hierarchy or in the congregation, should leave behind a valuable record. These Almanacks document Emerson’s reading of such figures as Dugald Stewart, William Wollaston, Edward Gibbon, Isaac Newton, John Locke, and Felicia Hemans, and, as is typical for her, Emerson derives tremendous pleasure from these intellectual pursuits, finding "every day . . . somet[hing] new in books" and describing "reading with a delight which nothin[g it] seems could inspire but novelty in knowledge."

To see a list of the texts recently added to Women Writers Online, visit our new titles page. Or visit our full title list for a complete list of all the titles currently included in WWO.

March 1, 2015

Women Writers Online is Free for the Month of March!

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March. We invite you to explore and enjoy the 358 texts in the collection!

October 14, 2014

The WWP Adds Eight New Texts to Women Writers Online

The WWP is pleased to announce the addition of eight new texts to Women Writers Online. Highlights include religious meditations by Martha Simmons and Maria Stewart, Mercy Warren’s The Blockheads: or, the Affrighted Officers (1776), Aphra Behn’s translation of La Montre: or The Lover’s Watch (1686), and Charlotte Smith’s Elegiac Sonnets (1797). With these additions, the WWO collection now contains more than 350 texts from the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries.

To see a list of the texts recently added to Women Writers Online, visit our new titles page. Or visit our full title list for a complete list of all the titles currently included in WWO.

April 1, 2014

Encoder Predilection Profiling Tool now available from the Women Writers Project

The Women Writers Project is pleased to share a new analytical instrument which we hope will be useful to other members of the TEI community. Please try out the Encoder Predilection Profiling Tool (EPPT)

The EPPT supports an assessment of the profilee on the following four metrics:

  1. Source-oriented vs data-oriented encoding tendencies
  2. Normative vs. descriptive encoding tendencies
  3. General-purpose vs. project-specific encoding tendencies
  4. Research-driven vs. function-driven encoding tendencies

It generates an overall four-letter code that can be used to categorize individuals and locate them on a matrix of profiles. Our informal research thus far suggests that these profiles provide a valuable understanding of the deep motivations, preferences, anxieties, and drives that influence encoding decisions. For an encoding language as subtle and rich as the TEI, these factors play a much more decisive part in the encoding outcomes than would be the case in simpler languages like HTML or EAD. Understanding the different fundamental types of encoders is one important step towards a greater understanding of how text encoding operates as a representational system.

The WWP anticipates that this tool could be very helpful in screening applicants for TEI workshops, helping to ensure that applicants end up in a workshop that matches their encoder profile and also determining what pedagogical approaches, case studies, and other components will be most effective for a given set of workshop participants. One could also use the instrument to help counsel participants in developing project strategy that takes account of (and if necessary compensates for) their tendencies in a particular direction. At the WWP, we’ve also found this instrument helpful in profiling incoming WWP encoders and staff, to gauge their aptitude in particular areas of the TEI and assign them to specific work areas as appropriate.

A further analytical step that we have not yet undertaken is to characterize each individual profile in the resulting matrix, but this may be an exercise that others in the community will find appealing.

We hope that others may also find this a useful tool and we welcome feedback.

March 1, 2014

Free Women Writers Online Access for Month of March

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March. We invite you to explore the 350 texts in the collection!

June 28, 2013

WWP moves to Northeastern University

After 25 productive years at Brown University the Women Writers Project and its staff will be moving to Northeastern University on July 1, 2013. The project will become part of the Northeastern Library’s Digital Scholarship Group, directed by Julia Flanders. During our time at Brown the project has received tremendous support from the University Library and from Computing and Information Services, for which we will remain perpetually grateful. Hundreds of Brown graduate and undergraduate students have contributed to the project’s development: transcribing and encoding texts, performing biographical and bibliographic research, transcribing and analyzing syllabi, maintaining contact with subscribers, and contributing to the project’s published research.

Publication of Women Writers Online will continue without interruption. Over the course of the summer and fall, the WWP’s systems, publications, and communications will be moved to Northeastern University, and subscribers will receive further information about updated links and contact information.

April 30, 2013

New series: Women Writers in Context

We are happy to announce the launch of a new series of contextual essays and exhibits, Women Writers in Context. The series offers critical and historical perspectives on the WWO collection, in a flexible format that includes timelines of significant events, biographical glosses, keywords for thematic exploration, and other features. In addition to recruiting new essays, over time we will also be republishing all of the essays from Renaissance Women Online in this new format. Read more

April 15, 2013

Teaching with TEI: deadline approaching

The deadline for applications for Taking TEI Further: Teaching with TEI is coming up on June 1. Join us for a three-day intensive seminar to explore the use of text encoding and digital scholarship in the classroom. Travel funding is available. Apply

March 1, 2013

WWO free for Womens History Month

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March. Please browse and enjoy!

February 20, 2013

New texts in WWO

A dozen texts have just been added to WWO, including works by Anna Barbauld, Eleanor Davies, Susanna Rowson, Mary Evelyn, and others.

March 7, 2012

New Women Writers Online interface launched as a public beta

We are excited to announce the beta launch of the newly redesigned Women Writers Online. This early beta version represents the first step in redeveloping the WWO interface and moving WWO onto a platform of modern XML publishing tools. While the new interface still has a number of limitations and bugs, it also retains and improves on many features of the existing WWO, including full-text searching, searching on bibliographic data, and a clear reading interface.

The new WWO interface is just the beginning: we plan to add a number of important features during the next year, including freely available contextual and biographical essays, contemporary reviews and reception materials, greater reader control over the display of the reading text, and new tools for exploration such as maps and other visualizations.

Both the new and old interfaces will remain available during the month of March 2012. The old WWO will be retired permanently in early April.

March 1, 2012

Free Women Writers Online access

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March. We invite you to explore the 334 texts in the collection!

July 27, 2011

WWP receives two NEH grants

The WWP is pleased and honored to receive two grants from the NEH. We have been awarded $249,947 for "Taking TEI Further, a three-year series of institutes on advanced topics in text encoding, including XSLT for humanists, customizing the TEI, and teaching with TEI. This project begins in March 2012 and a schedule of events will be posted early in 2012. We have also been awarded a joint NEH/DFG grant in support of a symposium on data modeling in the humanities, in partnership with the University of Würzburg, which will be held at Brown University in spring 2012.

March 1, 2011

Free Women Writers Online access

In celebration of Women’s History Month, Women Writers Online will be freely available during the month of March. We invite you to explore the 334 texts in the collection!

December 30, 2010

Publication of new texts

The WWP is pleased to announce the addition of twelve new texts to Women Writers Online. Highlights include three dramas by Aphra Behn, Margaret Cavendish’s Philosophical Letters (1664), Sarah Stone’s A Complete Practice of Midwifery (1737), and Hannah Kilham’s Memoir of the Late Hannah Kilham (1837). With these additions, the WWO collection now contains more than 330 texts from the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries.

To see a list of the texts recently added to Women Writers Online, visit our new titles page. Or visit our full title list for a complete list of all the titles currently included in WWO.

November 17, 2010

Call for proposals: Women in the Archives 2011

The call for proposals for Women in the Archives: Organizing Knowledge is now available. Proposals are due January 15, 2011.

September 21, 2010

Save the date: Women in the Archives 2011

The fourth annual Women in the Archives conference will be held on April 15-16, 2011 at Brown University. Save the date and watch for the call for participation later this fall.

September 1, 2010

WWP receives major NEH award

The Women Writers Project has received funding for a three-year, $200K project from the National Endowment for the Humanities, focusing on the reception and readership of early women’s writing. Starting in January 2011, the WWP will undertake a collaborative research project to investigate the role that women’s literary writing and its reception played in the formation of Anglophone literary culture in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The WWP will digitize a range of sources, including material from printed reviews, anthologies, and early literary histories, as well as manuscript materials like diaries, letters, and commonplace books. Working with these materials, the project’s core collaborators will produce an interconnected group of scholarly articles exploring the cultural geographies of women’s literary reception between 1770 and 1830. These peer-reviewed articles will be published online as part of the WWP’s open-access collection of exhibits, articles, and contextual information on women’s writing. The source materials will also be made publicly accessible through an exploratory interface so that other scholars can further extend and contribute to this line of research in the future.

More information can be found at the project description page.

May 25, 2010

WWP announces new workshop series

The Women Writers Project is pleased to announce a new series of workshops on topics in TEI encoding and tools for digital humanists. These workshops are aimed at humanities faculty, librarians, students, and anyone interested in getting a strong introduction to digital humanities concepts, methods, and tools. Each workshop combines hands-on practice with discussion and lectures, and participants are encouraged to work with their own project materials. These small group events offer a wonderful opportunity to learn about other digital projects as well as to master important methods and concepts in an exploratory setting. Students and members of the TEI consortium receive a 33% discount on registration.

More information, including detailed workshop descriptions and registration information, can be found at our workshops page.

January 4, 2010

Zotero integration comes to Women Writers Online

All Women Writers Online texts now feature integration with the Zotero bibliographic citation manager, a free extension for the web browsers developed by the Center for History and New Media at George Mason University. Readers who currently use Zotero to manage research sources can now automatically add WWO texts to their Zotero libraries simply by clicking the book icon that appears in the web browser’s navigation bar; readers who do not use Zotero will see no visible changes to the normal appearance of WWO texts.

To learn more about Zotero, or to download the plugin for Firefox, visit the offical Zotero site.

Publication of new texts

The WWP is pleased to announce the addition of fourteen new texts to Women Writers Online. Highlights include Anne Cooke’s translation of The Sermons of Barnardine Ochine (1570), Eliza Haywood’s The British Recluse (1722), Sarah Pennington’s An Unfortunate Mother’s Advice to Her Absent Daughters (1773), Susanna Rowson’s The Inquisitor; or the Invisible Rambler (1794), and the complete text of Charlotte Smith’s The Old Manor House (1793). With these additions, the WWO collection now contains more than 320 texts from the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries.

To see a list of the texts recently added to Women Writers Online, visit our new titles page. Or visit our full title list for a complete list of all the titles currently included in WWO.